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Safety experts outraged as Trump administration nixes sleep apnea test for truckers and train engineers

  • The US is not pursuing sleep apnea tests for truck drivers and train engineers
  • Safety experts say the decision could put millions of lives at risk
  • Sleep apnea is a disorder that occurs when that muscles relax during sleep
  • It blocks the airways and causes suffers to wake up regularly through the night
  • Agencies have argued it should be up to railroads and companies to decide if they want to test their employees

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The Trump[2] administration is cutting regulations that would require sleep apnea screening for truck drivers and train engineers.

The decision, according to safety experts, could put millions of lives at risk.

The fatigue-inducing disorder, which affects roughly one in five Americans, has been blamed for deadly rail crashes in New York City[3] and New Jersey and several highway crashes.

However, late last week the Federal Railroad Administration and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration said they are no longer pursuing the regulation that would require testing for it.

 The Trump administration is cutting regulations that would require sleep apnea screening for truck driver and train engineers. Pictured is the destruction caused by the Metro North derailment at the Spuyten Duyvil station in December 2013. In that case the driver had sleep apnea

The Trump administration is cutting regulations that would require sleep apnea screening for truck driver and train engineers. Pictured is the destruction caused by the Metro North derailment at the Spuyten Duyvil station in December 2013.

In that case the driver had sleep apnea

Sleep apnea is one of the most common sleep disorders. It occurs when the muscles and soft tissues in the throat relax during sleep, which blocks the airways.

The resulting lack of oxygen in the brain causes sufferers to wake regularly through the night, causing sleepiness, difficulty concentrating and memory or learning problems.

The agencies argue it should be up to railroads and trucking companies to decide whether to test employees.

One railroad that does test, Metro-North in the New York City suburbs, found that 11.6 percent of its engineers have sleep apnea.

The decision to kill the sleep apnea regulation is the latest step in the president’s campaign to drastically slash federal regulations.

The administration has withdrawn or delayed hundreds of proposed regulations since he took office in January – moves the president has said will help bolster economic growth.

Late last year, the FRA issued a safety advisory urging railroads to begin sleep apnea testing while the law requiring it made its way through the legislative process.

Without a regulation mandating testing – which would have needed approval from Congress – trucking companies or railroads couldn’t be issued citations if a truck or train crashed because the operator fell asleep at the helm.

Sleep apnea is especially troubling for the transportation industry because sufferers are repeatedly awakened and robbed of rest as their airway closes and their breathing stops, leading to dangerous daytime drowsiness.

Treatments include wearing a pressurized breathing mask, oral appliances or nasal strips to force the airway open while sleeping. Some severe cases require surgery.

‘It’s very hard to argue that people aren’t being put at risk,’ said Sarah Feinberg, the former administrator of the FRA, who had issued the safety advisory in December.

‘We cannot have someone who is in that condition operating either a train going 70 mph or operating a multi-ton truck traveling down the interstate.

It’s just not an appropriate level of risk to be exposing passengers and the traveling public to.’

WHAT IS SLEEP APNEA?

Sleep apnea is one of the most common sleep disorders in the US, impacting roughly one in five American adults.

It occurs when the muscles and soft tissues in the throat relax during sleep, which blocks the airways.

The resulting lack of oxygen in the brain causes sufferers to wake regularly through the night.

Common symptoms include loud snoring, gasping and grunting during sleep.

Another common sign is fighting sleepiness during the day, at work, or while driving. It can also cause difficulty concentrating and memory or learning problems.

Sleep Spnea often goes undiagnosed because it isn’t tested for in routine visits.

Although snoring is a symptom of the condition, not all those that snore have the disorder.

The condition has serious physical health consequences, including an increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

Most sufferers manage their symptoms by wearing an oxygen mask at night or an oral device to keep the airways open.

The National Transportation Safety Board said it was disappointed the agencies decided to scrap the ‘much-needed rulemaking.’

‘Obstructive sleep apnea has been in the probable cause of 10 highway and rail accidents investigated by the NTSB in the past 17 years and obstructive sleep apnea is an issue being examined in several, ongoing, NTSB rail and highway investigations,’ NTSB spokesman Christopher O’Neil said.

The NTSB has long recommended the testing for engineers, and Metro-North and the Long Island Rail Road started requiring it after a severe crash in 2013.

In that case the engineer of a Metro-North train had fallen asleep at the controls because he had severe undiagnosed sleep apnea.

The engineer, William Rockefeller, told investigators he felt strangely ‘dazed’ right before the crash, which occurred as he sped through a 30 mph curve going 82 mph.

And last Steptember the engineer of the New Jersey Transit train that killed a woman when it slammed into a station in Hoboken also suffered from undiagnosed sleep apnea, according to his lawyer.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said he will push the federal agencies to reconsider withdrawing the proposed regulation.

‘There are some regulations that go too far but this is not one of them,’ Schumer told The Associated Press.

‘Repealing it will risk lives.’

When asked about the government’s contention that businesses could enact their own testing policies, he said: ‘Tell that to the families of the people who died in Spuyten Duyvil,’ referring to the neighborhood where the Metro-North train crashed in 2013, killing four people.

Train engineers are currently required to undergo vision and hearing testing at least every three years. Some railroads also require annual physicals, but there are no federal standards for comprehensive medical exams.

Many of the largest passenger railroads, including Amtrak, require engineers to undergo sleep apnea screening.

The Association of American Railroads, an industry group, said railroads are continuing to take steps to combat worker fatigue, including confidential sleep disorder screening and treatment.

Marc Willis, a spokesman for the FRA, said the agency sought information from the public about sleep apnea and ‘believes that current railroad and FRA safety programs sufficiently address this risk.’

Feinberg said that isn’t sufficient and the government shouldn’t rely on industries regulating themselves.

A notice posted in the Federal Register said the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration would consider updating a 2015 bulletin to medical examiners about the physical qualifications standard and respiratory dysfunction.

Duane DeBruyne, a spokesman for the agency, declined to answer questions about the NTSB’s concerns.

References

  1. ^ e-mail (www.dailymail.co.uk)
  2. ^ Trump (www.dailymail.co.uk)
  3. ^ New York City (www.dailymail.co.uk)


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