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‘A pawn in her sick game’: Woman, 20, ‘persuaded her boyfriend, 18, to kill himself in a calculated bid to get attention as the grieving girlfriend and she even carried out a …

  • Michelle Carter, 20, was charged with the manslaughter of Conrad Roy II, 18, who killed himself in July 2014
  • Carter ‘sent Roy a series of texts encouraging him to take his own life’
  • Prosecutors say she encouraged him in a calculated a bid to get ‘attention’ as the grieving girlfriend
  • ‘She used Conrad as a pawn in her sick game of life and death,’ they said
  • Defense lawyers say she was actually trying to help Roy who was found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning in his idling truck
  • They argue that she tried repeatedly to talk him out of it and only began to support the plan when it became clear he would not change his mind
  • Carter has now waived her right to a jury trial, meaning her testimony will only be heard by a judge, who will issue the verdict
  • Scroll down to see texts Carter and Roy exchanged in the run up to his death

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Michelle Carter (pictured in court on Tuesday) is charged in the 2014 death of 18-year-old Conrad Roy III who committed suicide in July 2014

Michelle Carter (pictured in court on Tuesday) is charged in the 2014 death of 18-year-old Conrad Roy III who committed suicide in July 2014

A prosecutor says a woman accused of sending texts encouraging her boyfriend, 18, to kill himself used him ‘as a pawn in her sick game’.

Michelle Carter is charged in the 2014 death of 18-year-old Conrad Roy III who was found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning in his pickup truck in Fairhaven in July 2014.

Prosecutors say that the 20-year-old had persuaded Roy to kill himself in calculated a bid to get ‘attention’ as the grieving girlfriend.

‘She used Conrad as a pawn in her sick game of life and death,’ said prosecutor Maryclare Flynn.

They added that on July 10, two days before his suicide, she had carried out a ‘dry run’.

‘She knew her plan to get attention would work because she pre-tested it,’ they said.

‘Two days before Conrad committed suicide, she did a dry run, texting several girls that Conrad had gone missing while simultaneously testing Conrad, telling him to get the gas machine.’

The court heard that Carter sent 40 text messages to Roy urging him to kill himself before he finally took his own life.

‘She put him in the car that night,’ Flynn added.

Carter, who appeared in court in a salmon pink jacket on Tuesday, had then played the grieving girlfriend, even organizing a baseball tournament in his memory – but hosted it in Plainville – her hometown not Roy’s, the court heard.

Lynn Roy, the mother of Conrad Roy III, is offered tissues during her testimony before Judge Lawrence Moniz on Tuesday

Lynn Roy, the mother of Conrad Roy III, is offered tissues during her testimony before Judge Lawrence Moniz on Tuesday

Camdyn Roy, the sister Conrad Roy III, points to the defendant Michelle Carter to identify her while testifying in Carter's trial, Tuesday

Camdyn Roy, the sister Conrad Roy III, points to the defendant Michelle Carter to identify her while testifying in Carter’s trial, Tuesday

Roy family members react when crime-scene photos are projected during the trial of Michelle Carter, Tuesday, in Taunton

Roy family members react when crime-scene photos are projected during the trial of Michelle Carter, Tuesday, in Taunton

Prosecutors say Carter sent her boyfriend Conrad Roy (pictured) dozens of text messages urging him to take his own life before he was found in his pickup truck in Fairhaven, Massachusetts on July 13, 2014

Prosecutors say Carter sent her boyfriend Conrad Roy (pictured) dozens of text messages urging him to take his own life before he was found in his pickup truck in Fairhaven, Massachusetts on July 13, 2014

Roy’s best friend Thomas Gammell asked her to move the memorial game but she had refused.

Texts they exchanged about the game revealed she wanted to ensure she got credit for the baseball tournament

‘Ok awesome thank you! You’re not taking credit for my idea, right?’ she text him.

Defense attorney Joseph Cataldo said Roy previously was suicidal and Carter had talked him out of taking his life.

He said today that Roy was seriously depressed over the divorce of his parents and a victim of physical abuse by a relative who was on a ‘path to take his own life for years’.

He added that Carter was not responsible for his death.

‘This is a suicide case,’ he said, ‘not a not a homicide.’

Text messages, displayed in court, revealed Carter had pushed her boyfriend to kill himself, telling him 'it's time to do it today'

Text messages, displayed in court, revealed Carter had pushed her boyfriend to kill himself, telling him ‘it’s time to do it today’

A photograph of the truck, in which Conrad Roy III killed himself, is projected during testimony in the trial

A photograph of the truck, in which Conrad Roy III killed himself, is projected during testimony in the trial

Grief-stricken members of the Roy family break down in tears during the trial, Tuesday, June 6

Grief-stricken members of the Roy family break down in tears during the trial, Tuesday, June 6

Roy’s mother Lynn Roy, who broke down in tears during her testimony, also took the stand, telling Taunton Trial Court about her son’s struggle with depression.

She said he had social anxiety and had been having ‘bad thoughts’.

Lynn Roy said that on the night he died, she and he son had taken a walk along the beach, laughing, joking and talking ‘about life’.

‘You think your kids are doing better,’ Roy said, alluding to her son’s previous suicide attempt.

Gammell later took the stand, saying that he had never even heard of Carter until Roy’s death.

Carter waived her right to a jury, meaning the judge will hear the testimony and issue the verdict.

Prosecutors released transcripts of text messages the then-17-year-old Carter sent to Roy. In one, she allegedly wrote: ‘The time is right and you’re ready, you just need to do it!’

The court heard that Carter and Roy exchanged more than 20,000 text messages – with more than 1,000 of those messages sent in the days leading up to Roy’s death.

Prosecutors say Carter sent her boyfriend dozens of text messages urging him to take his own life.

Michelle Carter (in court on Tuesday) is accused of sending texts encouraging her boyfriend, 18, to kill himself of using him 'as a pawn in her sick game'

Michelle Carter (in court on Tuesday) is accused of sending texts encouraging her boyfriend, 18, to kill himself of using him ‘as a pawn in her sick game’

Michelle Carter (in court Monday with her attorney) allegedly encouraged her boyfriend, 18, to kill himself

Michelle Carter (in court Monday with her attorney) allegedly encouraged her boyfriend, 18, to kill himself

Carter’s lawyer argue that she tried repeatedly to talk him out of it and only began to support the plan when it became clear he would not change his mind.

They add that the texts are protected under free speech and that Roy was depressed and previously tried to take his own life.

Carter was 17 when Roy took his own life via carbon monoxide poisoning and prosecutors argue she is criminally responsible because she encouraged him to kill himself in a series of text messages.

In some exchanges, she even revealed she was frustrated he had not taken his life yet.

‘Well…

I guess [that I am frustrated] just because you always say you are gonna do it but you don’t,’ she text him. ‘But last night I know you really wanted to do it and I’m not mad. Well, I mean, kind of, I guess, just because you always say you’re gonna do it… but you don’t but last night I knew you really wanted to and I’m not mad.’

When he mentioned he was worried it would hurt his family, Carter told him they’d ‘get over it’.

‘Everyone will be sad for a while but they will get over it and move on. They won’t be in depression.

I won’t let that happen. They know how sad you are, and they know that you are doing this to be happy and I think they will understand and accept it. They will always carry you in their hearts.’

Carter, 20, was pictured arriving at Taunton Trial Court in Massachusetts, for the first day of her trial Carter, 20, was pictured arriving at Taunton Trial Court in Massachusetts, for the first day of her trial

Carter, 20, was pictured arriving at Taunton Trial Court in Massachusetts, for the first day of her trial on Monday

Cater, wearing a quilted jacket, and her attorney Joseph Cataldo walk into court on Monday

Cater, wearing a quilted jacket, and her attorney Joseph Cataldo walk into court on Monday

Others she badgered him whether he was going to ‘do it today’, adding in another exchange ‘tonight is the night.

It’s now or never’.

In another text, Roy told her he was ‘gonna do it today’ to which she replied ‘You promise?’

In the hour before his death, prosecutors say, he was on the phone with Carter for 47 minutes, at one point telling her he was getting out of the truck because he feared it wasn’t working.

‘The car was filling up, and he was scared,’ said prosecutor Flynn. ‘She told him to get back in the car.’

‘When he actually started to carry out the act, he got scared again and exited his truck, but instead of telling him to stay out of the truck… Carter told him to ‘get back in’,’ the police report said.

Days before the suicide, prosecutors say Carter wrote, ‘Don’t be scared. You’re finally to be happy in Heaven.’

‘When are you going to do it?

Stop ignoring the question???? You can’t keep push [sic] it off,’ prosecutors claimed Carter texted Roy.

‘It’s inconceivable,’ said Claudette Roy-Viaol, Roy’s great aunt to ABC News[2]. ‘I just don’t understand how someone could do that, to encourage someone they claimed to love.’

The court heard that Roy III had tried to kill himself before he ever met Carter

The court heard that Roy III had tried to kill himself before he ever met Carter

Conrad Roy III (above) took his own life via carbon monoxide poisoning in 2014. Prosecutors argue Carter is criminally responsible because she encouraged him to kill himself Conrad Roy III (above) took his own life via carbon monoxide poisoning in 2014. Prosecutors argue Carter is criminally responsible because she encouraged him to kill himself

Conrad Roy III (left and right) took his own life via carbon monoxide poisoning in 2014.

Prosecutors argue Carter is criminally responsible because she encouraged him to kill himself

Roy had also attempted suicide and had been hospitalized before he met Carter.

In a text message sent two weeks before his suicide, he wrote of his desire to end his own life. ‘I can’t get better,’ he wrote. ‘I already made my decision.’

Roy’s body was found in the truck in Fairhaven, Massachusetts on July 13, 2014, after his parents reported him missing, and police found the text messages after looking through his phone.

Police found a gasoline-operate water pump in the back seat of the truck after he died. A coroner later ruled he died of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Carter messaged one of her friends nearly a week later expressing her fears that her messages to Roy had been found, People reported.

‘I just got off the phone with Conrads mom about 20 mins ago and she told me that detectives had to come and go thru his things and stuff,’ she wrote.

Michelle Carter, who broke down in tears in Taunton Trial Court (pictured) took the witness stand on Monday

Michelle Carter, who broke down in tears in Taunton Trial Court (pictured) took the witness stand on Monday

FILE-- In this July 29, 2016, file photo Michelle Carter stands with her attorneys at the Bristol County Juvenile Court in Taunton, Mass. Jury selection is set to begin Monday, June 5, 2017, in the trial of Carter who is accused of sending her boyfriend dozens of text messages encouraging him to kill himself. (George Rizer/The Globe via AP, Pool, File)

Michelle Carter (pictured in court in July 2016) told the court her decision to waive the right to jury on Monday

FILE - In this Oct.
/p
p14, 2016, file photo, defendant Michelle Carter is seated inside Taunton Juvenile Court during a pretrial hearing in Taunton, Mass. Jury selection is set to begin Monday, June 5, 2017, in the trial of Carter who is accused of sending her boyfriend dozens of text messages encouraging him to kill himself. (Patrick Whittemore/The Boston Herald via AP, Pool, File)

A judge will hear the testimony and issue the verdict in Carter’s (pictured in court in 2014) manslaughter trial

‘They read my messages with him I’m done…

His family will hate me and I could go to jail.’

The case involving Carter has drawn national attention after transcripts of those text messages were made public.

Even though Carter, who met Roy while on a vacation to Florida several years earlier, reportedly called herself his ‘girlfriend’, his friends and family said they never knew of the relationship.

Carter had also repeatedly posted online about how much she missed him, saying at one point, ‘I will never understand why this had to happen.’

In March, a controversial psychiatrist said Carter was ‘involuntarily intoxicated’ by prescribed antidepressants when she texted her boyfriend encouragement as he committed suicide.

Psychiatrist Dr Peter Breggin testified that Carter was not responsible because she was being treated with the antidepressant Celexa in 2014, which would have altered her brain and meant she wouldn’t have understood the impact of her texts to Roy.

Carter had posted on social media on the day Roy committed suicide saying he had 'gone too soon'

Carter had posted on social media on the day Roy committed suicide saying he had ‘gone too soon’

‘She had no notion of wrongfulness on what she was doing,’ Dr Breggin told the court, according to 12WPRI[3].

Dr Breggin, who was hired by defense attorneys, said Carter loved Roy but experienced a metamorphosis due to her medication.

‘The impairment of being on the drugs while you are growing up – while you’re brain is maturing, while your frontal lobes are developing – you’re talking about being inundated with neurotoxic effects,’ he said.

Prosecutors criticized Dr Breggin’s credentials during cross-examination and sought to discredit him as an ‘extremist’ who was critical of antidepressants.

Assistant District Attorney Katie Rayburn pushed Dr Breggin to admit he only reached his conclusion about Carter based on medical records and the text exchange between her and Roy.

The judge did not rule on whether Dr Breggin can testify but the psychiatrist has been previously banned from testifying in other cases.

Carter’s defense team were granted a request late last year for funds to hire an expert to examine the antidepressant she was taking at the time.

Her attorney Joseph Cataldo said at the time the drug Celexa could be the key to her defense because it can increase suicidal thoughts.

For confidential help, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or visit suicidepreventionlifeline.org[4].

‘IT’S NOW OR NEVER’: MICHELLE CARTER’S TEXT MESSAGES TO CONRAD ROY

Prosecutors say Michelle Carter sent her boyfriend, Conrad Roy III, dozens of text messages urging him to take his own life.

Carter’s lawyer argue that she tried repeatedly to talk him out of it and only began to support the plan when it became clear he would not change his mind.

Here are excerpts from their text exchanges, with messages cited by her lawyer first, followed by those cited by prosecutors:

June 29, 2014:

Carter: ‘But the mental hospital would help you. I know you don’t think it would but I’m telling you, if you give them a chance, they can save your life’

Carter: ‘Part of me wants you to try something and fail just so you can get help’

Roy: ‘It doesn’t help. trust me’

Carter: ‘So what are you gonna do then? Keep being all talk and no action and everyday go thru saying how badly you wanna kill yourself?

Or are you gonna try to get better?’

Roy: ‘I can’t get better I already made my decision.’

July 7, 2014:

Roy: ‘If you were in my position. honestly what would you do’

Carter: ‘I would get help. That’s just me tho. When I have a serious problem like that, my first instinct is to get help because I know I can’t do it on my own’

Roy: ‘Well it’s too late I already gave up.’

Between July 6, 2014 and July 12, 2014:

Carter: ‘Always smile, and yeah, you have to just do it.

You have everything you need. There is no way you can fail. Tonight is the night.

It’s now or never.’

Carter: ‘(D)on’t be scared. You already made this decision and if you don’t do it tonight you’re gonna be thinking about it all the time and stuff all the rest of your life and be miserable.

You’re finally going to be happy in heaven. No more pain.

No more bad thoughts and worries. You’ll be free.’

Carter: ‘I just want to make sure you’re being serious. Like I know you are, but I don’t know.

You always say you’re gonna do it, but you never do. I just want to make sure tonight is the real thing.’

Carter: ‘When are you gonna do it? Stop ignoring the question’

Carter: ‘You can’t keep living this way.

You just need to do it like you did the last time and not think about it and just do it, babe. You can’t keep doing this every day.

Roy: ‘I do want to but I’m like freaking for my family I guess. I don’t know.’

Carter: ‘Conrad, I told you I’ll take care of them.

Everyone will take care of them to make sure they won’t be alone and people will help them get through it. We talked about this and they will be okay and accept it. People who commit suicide don’t think this much.

They just could do it.’

References

  1. ^ e-mail (www.dailymail.co.uk)
  2. ^ ABC News (abcnews.go.com)
  3. ^ 12WPRI (wpri.com)
  4. ^ suicidepreventionlifeline.org (suicidepreventionlifeline.org)

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LDz Cargo carries 4.4% more freight in January-May

LDz Cargo, a freight-shipping subsidiary of the Latvian state-owned railway company Latvijas Dzelzcels (Latvian Railway), carried 21.259 mln tons of freight in the first five months of 2017, up 4.4% from the same period in 2016, according to information released by the company.

170606_lit_airport.jpg

In May this year, the company carried 3.677 mln tons of freight, down 1.9% from the same months in 2016.

Most of the freight carried by LDz Cargo in the five months of 2017 was import cargos, accounting for 18.632 mln tons and growing 2.9% year-on-year. Of this amount, 17.349 mln tons were shipped through Latvian ports, which was 5.9% more than a year ago.

During the five months LDz Cargo carried 1.427 mln tons of transit freight by land, which was nearly 2.3 times more than a year ago.

Export cargos in the five months of 2017 fell 36.2% y-o-y to 696,000 tons, and export cargos shipped through Latvian ports decreased by 0.6% to 535,000 tons. Shipping of domestic cargos declined by 4.2% to 504,000 tons.

LDz Cargo carried 20.362 mln tons of freight in the five months of 2016 and 47.819 mln tons of freight in the full 2016, down 14.1% from 2015.

Latvian Railway, a fully state-owned company, is the sole owner of LDz Cargo, which was set up as a subsidiary in charge of freight transportation during restructuring of the railway company.

LDz Cargo is the largest railway freight carrier in the Baltic states.