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Logistics Expert Akylbek Zhumabaev On New Opportunities In Cargo Transit Aviation In Africa

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Mfonobong Nsehe[1] , Contributor I chronicle Africa’s success stories and track its richest people Opinions expressed by Forbes Contributors are their own.

After seven lackluster years of flat growth[2], the international air freight industry leapt back to vigorous expansion in 2017 and seems headed for continued strength this year, led by remarkable rises in Africa and Eurasia. Among the biggest shippers are the world’s military that use civilian air freight carriers as key elements in their logistics planning. I recently caught up with Akylbek Zhumabaev, the former Chairman of the Board of the Kyrgyz Republic Civil Aviation who gave me his insights as to where the globalizing airfreight industry is heading.

You think the key to continued growth in the industry of air cargo will be via next generation-technology bespoke to meet the challenges of globalization. Correct? I do.

Air cargo is a highly sophisticated business. It’s not a just matter of rolling big boxes onto big aircraft and filing a flight plan. Load factors, fuel consumption and a host of other data-based considerations go into every flight.

In a highly price-competitive world, this is what customers expect. The US military is a value-for-money buyer every bit as much as major retail organizations such as Amazon. We expect service providers to do everything possible to reduce costs and deliver on time.

That requires the very latest in flight support and cargo management technology. Akylbek Zhumabaev

Akylbek Zhumabaev Is this why the industry has returned to growth?

And why the big rise in deliveries to Africa? Freight demand in Africa last year was up a remarkable 24.8%. Well, it’s not the only reason of course.

There are multiple causes, including global economic recovery, rising Chinese and Indian interest in Africa, rising humanitarian aid flows, and more. Air cargo carriage is increasingly complex. New suppliers are constantly entering the field, as e-commerce takes off.

On the civilian side, governments and the carriers themselves are having to tackle major changes in shipping practices from regions such as China – particularly the shift from a few well known importers and exporters to the trend to small, individual importers and exporters that are largely unknown and oftentimes whose transactions may be irregular.

IATA estimates the global e-commerce revenue for 2019 to be USD 3.5 Trillion.

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[3]

References

  1. ^ Mfonobong Nsehe (www.forbes.com)
  2. ^ seven lackluster years of flat growth (www.fruitnet.com)
  3. ^ Continue (www.forbes.com)



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