Aspiring North Preston truck mechanic breaks barriers on two levels

Saedene Simmons is one of the first African Nova Scotian women to study heavy-duty equipment and truck and transport repair at NSCC. (CBC - image credit)

Saedene Simmons is one of the first African Nova Scotian women to study heavy-duty equipment and truck and transport repair at NSCC. (CBC – image credit)

A high school mechanics course wasn’t enough to satisfy Saedene Simmons’s automotive appetite. As soon as the teenager got home, she insisted on helping her father work on his car. It’s a love that father and daughter have shared for decades.

Now at 38, Simmons is making a mid-career shift rarely achieved by any woman, let alone a Black woman. Simmons is studying to be a truck mechanic. “I just figured, why not go back to what I love most?” Simmons, a mother of three, told CBC News. “I wanted to be a mechanic coming out of high school, so I figured why not try and see where that takes me.”

Simmons is one of the first African Nova Scotian women to study heavy-duty equipment and truck and transport repair at the Nova Scotia Community College.

Simmons has always had an interest in mechanics.

Simmons has always had an interest in mechanics.(CBC)

During the year-long course, she is developing entry-level skills to work as a heavy-duty equipment or truck and transport apprentice. The former caterer wants others to know it’s never too late to follow their dreams. “If Saedene can do it, so can I” is the message she has for young women.

“I’m taking the mechanics [program] because I want to drive trucks, so I want to learn the truck inside out before I actually drive it,” she said. Simmons was first introduced to heavy-duty trucks while watching her father, uncles and grandfather run the family’s paving company in North Preston. “Dad picking me up in the dump truck every day, I used to love doing that,” she said. “And him taking us to the gravel pit to unload the gravel and asphalt.”

Saedene Simmons's dad, Calvin (Ricky) Simmons, says his daughter always loved being around cars.

Saedene Simmons’s dad, Calvin (Ricky) Simmons, says his daughter always loved being around cars.(CBC)

Her father, Calvin (Ricky) Simmons, noticed his daughter’s mechanical infatuation early on.

He took Saedene to her first car show when she was three, and her passion for vehicles has grown ever since. “She loves being around cars,” he said. “I can honestly say none of my three sons have a passion for vehicles, cars, trucks, equipment like Saedene does — none of them.”
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‘A woman can do just about anything a man can do’ His pride in his daughter’s barrier-busting career path is tempered by fatherly concern. He said that as a Black woman, Saedene will have to prove herself in a field that is mostly white and male.

In his decades in the trucking industry, Ricky Simmons said he has never seen a Black woman under the hood. However, Saedene Simmons doesn’t think gender or race should determine one’s fate in the field of mechanics. “A woman can do just about anything a man can do,” she said. “I think I’ve been living by that my whole life or I wouldn’t be here, I’d probably be sitting in an office at a mechanic shop.”

Simmons with her instructor, Dayna Gillis-Lynds.

Simmons with her instructor, Dayna Gillis-Lynds.(CBC)

Simmons’s instructor at NSCC has an idea of what awaits women trying to break into the field.

Dayna Gillis-Lynds was the first woman to obtain her Red Seal certification at NSCC back in 2013. She said the industry counts just six women in all of Nova Scotia. “Being a female in the trade, I find you have to prove yourself a little harder than being male,” said Gillis-Lynds. “You know that eyes are on you, you know you’re being watched, you know you have to push yourself just that much harder, you have to show your abilities.”

Simmons said she wants to join the family’s paving business, but her immediate focus is graduating in June. Completing the truck repair course goes hand in hand with setting an example for her three children, she said. “For them to see that mom loves doing this and that she’s getting good grades — maybe if they see me doing that, then what they love to do most, they will carry that throughout school and their lives.”

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