News Desk

Tesco sounds alarm over driver shortages

The boss of Tesco has sounded the alarm over driver shortages as the labour crisis shows no signs of abating. 

Britain’s biggest supermarket chain said it was grappling with a chronic shortage of lorry drivers and was working hard to remedy the situation. 

The Road Haulage Association and company bosses met with ministers this week to stress a “growing peril” to supply chains from the worsening lorry driver shortage.

There is an estimated shortfall of some 65,000 drivers, mainly because EU workers had left the UK and the suspension of driver training and testing during the pandemic. The shortage has sent wages rise by a fifth. 

Ken Murphy, chief executive of Tesco, said that if the crisis worsens the retailer might have to pay more to attract drivers.

He insisted that there were no gaps on shelves because of the shortages and that the supply chain was “in good shape”. 

“What I’m hearing is we can manage it and we have to play it as we see it,” he added. “Once there is an understanding that there is availability of work [at Tesco among drivers] and rates are potentially more attractive, they will fill very quickly.”

About 48 tonnes of food – enough to fill two trucks – destined for Tesco is being thrown away every week as a result of the shortages. 

FareShare, the food redistribution charity, estimated that up to a third of the food that would otherwise be sent to its warehouses was not getting through due to problems in the haulage sector. 

Earlier this month FTSE 100 discount chain B&M also revealed it was struggling to hire both drivers and workers for night shifts at its distribution centres.

Tesco’s total retail like-for-like sales rose by 1pc to £13.4bn for the 13 weeks to May 29, and by 8.1pc compared to the same period two years ago.

Shares fell 2.4pc to 225p.

References

  1. ^ Markets Hub – Tesco (cf-particle-html.eip.telegraph.co.uk)

Man, 80, with Alzheimer’s at centre of urgent police search

*Update: Police have since confirmed Mr Sergeant has now been found safe and well.

The public are being urged to join an urgent search for a missing 80-year-old man who police say can “become confused” due to Alzheimer′s.

Alan Sergeant has vanished from his home in Warrington.

Police say he been seen since he left his home in Poplars and Hulme on foot shortly after 7.30am this morning.

READ MORE:M62 lorry driver saved man from falling after parking his lorry under bridge[1]

A spokesperson said the pensioner “has Alzheimer′s and can become confused”.

The Alzheimer’s Association[2] describe Alzheimer’s as “a type of dementia that affects memory, thinking and behavior. Symptoms eventually grow severe enough to interfere with daily tasks”.

Receive newsletters with the latest news, sport and what’s on updates from the Liverpool ECHO by signing up here[3]

Police have enlisted the public as they are “keen to locate him as soon as possible”.

Inspector Helen Cooper said: “A number of officers are currently out searching for Alan, so far to no avail, and we are concerned for his welfare.

“He has Alzheimer′s and often becomes confused, so we are keen to locate him as soon as possible.

““I urge anyone in or around Warrington who thinks that they may have seen Alan since he went missing to get in touch with us.

“The same goes for anyone with information regarding his whereabouts, or CCTV or dashcam footage of him since he left home on foot this morning.”

Alan is described as around 5’ 2” tall, of slim build and has short black/grey hair.

He was last seen wearing black pants, a black jacket and blue trainers.

He also has a tag on his eye and may also have a carrier bag.

Anyone with information or footage that may help officers find James is asked to call Cheshire Constabulary immediately on 101, quoting IML 1016125.

M62 driver parked lorry under bridge to stop man from jumping

A lorry driver has been hailed a hero after parking his truck under a bridge on the M62 to stop a man from jumping.

Tom Birkett, 35, was driving on the M62 near Warrington last week when he spotted someone sitting on the edge of a bridge with their legs dangling over the edge.[1]

The married dad-of-three slowed down as he approached – and managed to park his 44-tonne tipper truck directly underneath where the man was sitting.[2]

READ MORE:Thug spat chewed up sandwich remains in police officer’s face[3]

His Mercedes truck was also fitted with a canvas over the tipper, providing it with a soft top and essentially creating a net for the man to fall into, although luckily it was not needed.

Tom, from Kendal, Cumbria, said: “I was coming up to bridge when I clocked there were three people on it.

The lorry driver parked their vehicle underneath the man
The lorry driver parked their vehicle underneath the man (Image: Vulnerable Citizen Support Leeds)

“As I got closer I could see that the lad was sat on the wrong side of the barrier.[4]

“I thought, ‘I’m going to have to do something here, this lad’s going to jump off’.”

Tom then put his hazard lights on and began weaving his truck in order to notify other motorists there was a problem ahead.

He added: “I don’t know what clicked in my head but it suddenly dawned on me that I could help.

“I lined the truck up with the lad so the front of the trailer was underneath him.”

Receive newsletters with the latest news, sport and what’s on updates from the Liverpool ECHO by signing up here[5].

When Tom arrived, on June 8, police were already on the scene, including two officers on the bridge who were speaking to the man.

A short time later, a negotiator arrived and, according to Tom, spent around 45 mins talking to the man before he brought himself to safety.

Mental health and suicide support

Helplines and support groups

The following are helplines and support networks for people to talk to, mostly listed on the NHS Choices website[6]

  • Samaritans[7] (116 123) operates a 24-hour service available every day of the year. If you prefer to write down how you’re feeling, or if you’re worried about being overheard on the phone, you can email Samaritans at [email protected][8].
  • Childline[9] (0800 1111) runs a helpline for children and young people in the UK. Calls are free and the number won’t show up on your phone bill.
  • PAPYRUS[10] (0800 068 41 41) is an organisation supporting teenagers and young adults who are feeling suicidal.
  • Mind[11] (0300 123 3393) is a charity providing advice and support to empower anyone experiencing a mental health problem. They campaign to improve services, raise awareness and promote understanding.
  • Students Against Depression[12] is a website for students who are depressed, have a low mood or are having suicidal thoughts.
  • Bullying UK[13] is a website for both children and adults affected by bullying.
  • Amparo provides emotional and practical support for anyone who has been affected by a suicide. This includes dealing with police and coroners; helping with media enquiries; preparing for and attending an inquest and helping to access other, appropriate, local support services. Call 0330 088 9255 or visit www.amparo.org.uk[14] for more details.

  • Hub of Hope[15] is the UK’s most comprehensive national mental health support database. Download the free app, visit hubofhope.co.uk[16] or text HOPE to 85258 to find relevant services near you.
  • Young Persons Advisory Service – Providing mental health and emotional wellbeing services for Liverpool’s children, young people and families. tel: 0151 707 1025 email: [email protected][17][18]
  • Paul’s Place – providing free counselling and group sessions to anyone living in Merseyside who has lost a family member or friend to suicide. Tel: 0151 226 0696 or email: [email protected][19][20]
  • The Martin Gallier Project – offering face to face support for individuals considering suicide and their families. Opening hours 9.30-16.30, 7 days a week. Tel: 0151 644 0294 email: [email protected][21][22]

Tom said the entire ordeal lasted around two hours and that he was watching on from a barrier at the side of the road.

He added: “I can’t speak highly enough of how well the police did, they were fantastic. The negotiator did a phenomenal job too.

“I think what I did has been blown out of proportion, the police are the real heroes here.”

After watching the man get ushered away by police, Tom was allowed to return to his truck and continue his journey.

He said: “I hope that other drivers see this and know it’s an option.”

References

  1. ^ over the edge. (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  2. ^ man was sitting. (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  3. ^ Thug spat chewed up sandwich remains in police officer’s face (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  4. ^ the barrier. (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  5. ^ Liverpool ECHO by signing up here (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  6. ^ NHS Choices website (www.nhs.uk)
  7. ^ Samaritans (www.samaritans.org)
  8. ^ [email protected] (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  9. ^ Childline (www.childline.org.uk)
  10. ^ PAPYRUS (www.papyrus-uk.org)
  11. ^ Mind (www.mind.org.uk)
  12. ^ Students Against Depression (studentsagainstdepression.org)
  13. ^ Bullying UK (www.bullying.co.uk)
  14. ^ www.amparo.org.uk (www.amparo.org.uk)
  15. ^ Hub of Hope (www.hubofhope.co.uk)
  16. ^ hubofhope.co.uk (www.hubofhope.co.uk)
  17. ^ Young Persons Advisory Service (www.ypas.org.uk)
  18. ^ [email protected] (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  19. ^ Paul’s Place (beaconcounsellingtrust.co.uk)
  20. ^ [email protected] (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  21. ^ The Martin Gallier Project (www.gallierhouse.co.uk)
  22. ^ [email protected] (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)

NOSTALGIA: The Grade II listed Llanyrafon Mill

THE GRADE II listed, seventeenth century mill at Llanyrafon in Torfaen is unique to this part of Wales.

It contains a French stone milling system (using three pairs of millstones) – the next nearest example being at Carew in Pembrokeshire.

A mill was known to have been on the site since the middle ages but the first reference to the existing mill was in the 1630s when it was part of the large Morgan family estate.

Later it was owned by the Edlogan estates and the Griffiths and the Laybourne families of Llanyrafon.

In 1921, the mill was leased by miller Tom Wait and his family lived in the cottage behind.

Nigel Jones, of the Friends of Llanyravon Mill, wrote: “Tom [Wait] regularly milled grain brought by local farmers, and often visited the Corn Exchange near Newport docks to negotiate for a load of corn. This would be transported to Llantarnam railway station before the back-breaking task of transferring the sacks of corn from the railway wagon to a horse and cart.

“In 1929 Tom obtained his first lorry, which expanded the area [from] where he could collect grain and deliver [his] milled products.”

The mill ceased working in the early 1950s after the Wait family left Llanyrafon and fell into dereliction.

A fire in the early 1970s caused more damage. The Cwmbran Development Corporation, who had purchased the mill five years earlier, were then forced to try and find a way forward for the mill and ensure its survival.

Today, the mill is owned by Torfaen County Borough Council and the guardians of the site are The Friends of Llanyrafon Mill.

Nostalgia is provided by Torfaen Museum.

Letters: Need to leave UK is urgent as the Brexit woes pile up

THE Brexit[1] disasters are coming thick and fast. As climate change accelerates, the Australian trade deal will fly inferior beef and lamb around the world to displace higher-quality Welsh and Scottish products, driving small farmers out of business. The RSPCA has warned Australia’s animal welfare standards are far below those of the EU and begged Boris Johnson not to sign the agreement. Australia allows barren battery cages, sow stalls, hot branding, sheep mutilation and doesn’t require slaughterhouse CCTV or food, water or temperature control for live animal exports.

Meanwhile, soft fruit crops will rot in the fields thanks to a shortage of EU seasonal workers. A Fife soft fruit and veg farmer, Iain Brown, said Scotland[2] is falling short of the 10,000 fruit pickers needed to bring in this summer’s crops. Down in England’s new lorry park in Kent, Winterwood Farms has seen applications for seasonal work drop by 90% over the last two years. From the end of June, people who haven’t got pre-settled status can’t work. It’s no good hoping domestic workers will travel long distances to reach the fields, set up camp and engage in physically demanding work in all kinds of weather.

The haulage industry in Scotland has reported a shortage of 11,000 drivers due to Covid, Brexit and recent tax changes, which is hitting the supply of goods to shops and businesses and increasing prices.

The Scottish hospitality industry is reeling from staff shortages after EU nationals left and many domestic workers sought alternative work during the pandemic, forcing many businesses to limit customer numbers that will result in business[3] failures.

Westminster has never cared about Scotland. We can make our own decisions only when we restore our independence. In the meantime, we can pelt rotten fruit at Mr Johnson next time he dares to venture north.

Leah Gunn Barrett, Edinburgh.

THE HARD CASH JUST ISN’T THERE

I AM grateful to Frances McKie (Letters, June 16) for her detailed list of recent Scottish economic and other successes.

UK exports in April 2021 were £49.4 billion and appear to be heading back to their pre-pandemic levels. There is no evidence so far that Brexit is doing any damage, however much flak continues to be aimed at the referendum result. Even the Australians think that a flood of exported meat into the UK is unlikely, so the fears of the Scottish farming community may well be unfounded. I will be buying Scottish beef, lamb and pork from my local butcher regardless. It is good to have a choice though.

How foreign-manufactured wind turbines help Scotland’s fiscal deficit is a calculation I would very much like to see. The 2020 rise in inward investment projects is very welcome. Notice in the latter case that the press around this success fails to mention the monetary value of the investments concerned. Doing so would illustrate how little is its contribution in relation to a pre-pandemic budget deficit in 2019/20 of more than £15bn.

It is indeed ironic that Ms McKie chooses to highlight the growth in UK national debt over the last 10 years. All efforts to contain or even reduce that debt have – unless memory serves me incorrectly – been furiously derided in Scotland as (choose your adjective) “Tory austerity”.

Ms McKie’s closing paragraph sums up the Scottish problem. It is easy to talk up a positive but vague and soft focus vision of Scotland. You can clearly see, though, that the hard cash just isn’t there.

Grant Ballantyne, Paisley.

ENGLISH-ONLY VOTES DO AFFECT US

JILL Stephenson (Letters, June 17) claims that Michael Gove’s proposal to end English Votes for English Laws (Evel) is intended to appease the SNP. Not so for several reasons, of which the most important is Mr Gove (and Boris Johnson’s focus) on a UNITED Kingdom which is now described, for instance, by the Commonwealth as “an island country that sits north-west of mainland Europe. It is made up of mainland Great Britain (England, Wales and Scotland) and the northern part of the island of Ireland”, when just 12 months ago it consisted of “three countries plus the ‘province’ of NI”. For the UK to become the focus, a law[4] such as Evel is a contradiction and an obstacle to Mr Gove’s ends.

In any event, Evel conceals its own anomalies, as there are some issues which appear to apply only to England, but which have implications for Scotland. For instance, if a motion is put to the House for NHS spending in England only, it may appear that Evel should apply, but this ignores the fact that any spending variation in England will have implications for the Scottish block grant.

Ms Stephenson then goes on to over-generalise wildly, claiming that “English MPs have no input into matters affecting only Scotland” – but with their numerical dominance they have plenty of input into tax, trade policy including the recent agreement with Australia and Brexit, and defence. Indeed, Mr Johnson’s majority in the House of Commons (80) exceeds the number of MPs sitting for Scottish constituencies for any party (59).

She is correct that devolution throws up significant anomalies as Tam Dalyell forecast, but when one part of a political union has the sort of numerical dominance that England enjoys, the democratic deficit for the other constituent parts (OK, Mr Gove, not nations) is substantially more significant.

Alasdair Galloway, Dumbarton.

COMPARE THE TWO GOVERNMENTS

STRUAN Stevenson (“The SNP Government’s catalogue of mistakes will soon come back to haunt it”, The Herald, June 17) and Guy Stenhouse (“Action, not words, are needed to solve ferries fiasco”, The Herald, June 14) bleat week after week about the shortcomings of the SNP Government. Much of what they say is true, but their writings would have more credibility if they balanced the SNP’s failings with those of the Westminster Government.

Apart from the successful vaccine roll-out, I find it hard to think of any successes of Boris Johnson’s Government. However, like Nicola Sturgeon in Scotland, Mr Johnson seems to be in continued favour with his largely English support.

If I can suggest a title for Mr Stevenson’s next epistle, it would be “Compare and contrast the failures of the two governments’’.

Sam Craig, Glasgow G11.

PROOF THE UK IS NOT A NATION

I HAVE tried to be tolerant in the interests of free speech and have regarded the incessant anti-SNP barrage of letters[5] by Dr Gerald Edwards as an amusing distraction from serious debate. It does become a bit tiresome at times and I have to respond today to his assertion (Letters, June 16) that “the need for independence” is in some way linked with the SNP or Brexit. The case for independence is totally linked to the plight of our Scottish nation which has no opportunity to elect a government of its own choice. Neither the actions of the SNP nor the consequences of Brexit will change the situation; only the people of Scotland can rectify this democratic deficit.

Neither Britain nor the UK is a nation and anyone who doubts this should have their doubts dispelled this evening (June 18).

Willie Maclean, Milngavie.

DO NEW LAW OFFICERS BACK INDY?

THE Scottish Parliament has backed a motion seeking agreement to recommend to the Queen that Dorothy Bain QC and Ruth Charteris QC be appointed the new Scottish law officers; respectively lord advocate and solicitor general. Were both candidates asked for their opinions about the legal status of an independence referendum held without the consent of the Prime Minister? I’m sure both will have been asked, and surely both will have given an affirmative answer? Would they have been chosen otherwise? However, neither question nor answers will be acknowledged; we can expect evasion and fudge of a high order.

Another current item of legal news is the recent death, on May 31, of James Crawford, Professor Emeritus of International Law at the University of Cambridge. Prof Crawford was scathing about the Scottish Government’s claim that an independent Scotland would remain a member of such international organisations as the UN and the IMF. He claimed that the “overwhelming weight” of precedence pointed to Scotland being treated as a new state; meaning having to renegotiate some 14,000 separate treaties and applying afresh to join international bodies. Professor Crawford’s opinion does not die with him.

William Durward, Bearsden.

Read more: Australia deal shows PPE lessons have not been learned[6]

References

  1. ^ Brexit (www.heraldscotland.com)
  2. ^ Scotland (www.heraldscotland.com)
  3. ^ business (www.heraldscotland.com)
  4. ^ law (www.heraldscotland.com)
  5. ^ letters (www.heraldscotland.com)
  6. ^ Read more: Australia deal shows PPE lessons have not been learned (www.heraldscotland.com)

Charlie Cavey – The Busker in the bin

Charlie Cavey with the famous binTilly Palmer

“What came first, the chicken or the egg?” has puzzled humans for generations, but even more puzzling is finding yourself, on a Wednesday afternoon on King’s Parade, asking a man who has just stepped out of a trash can after you’ve frantically waved at him through a tiny slot: “What came first, the busking or the bin?”

Charlie Cavey has become an iconic figure to the Cambridge community for years – yet he remains relatively unknown. Unlatching the bin from the inside to climb out, Cavey reveals himself as a sunburnt man in a pink Hawaiian shirt. He tells me he was going to get a coffee and returns with a domestic-style pink china mug. It seems that this randomness is integral to his character. “This must be about my twenty-first or twenty-second summer, and it all started because I was working for myself, punting on the quayside. I was on the quayside touting, and a bin lorry pulled up next to us, and he (the driver) went over to the bin. He reached in and opened it up and took the bin out and was emptying it in his lorry. I looked at this empty bin and thought ‘I think I could fit in there,’ and that’s pretty much what happened. He put the bin back, shut the bin and I said to my friend ‘watch this’ and reached in, found the latch and opened it. I couldn’t play the guitar at the time. I learnt it the following winter and so the following summer when we all got back and started punting again, I showed my friend a few songs and he said ‘why don’t you try and do that in your bin?’ I said it was logistically impossible, and he said ’no feed the neck of the guitar through the hole, and hey presto that’s it twenty years later.”

“I looked at this empty bin and thought ’I think I could fit in there”

A fixture well documented on social media and frequented by celebrities – Tyson Fury was seen singing along to Oasis[1] with him last summer – he explains that “people walk along, they hear the music, they look around confused and then they see the arms sticking out the bin and think ‘What?’ and then they take pictures.” But it’s not all plain sailing. The University hasn’t taken kindly to him in the past. A Tab article in 2016[2] called him ‘the worst thing about Cambridge’ and in 2012, students were reprimanded by colleges[3] for an incident involving stink bombs and bleach being thrown into the bin. Interestingly, Cavey seems to be one of the only buskers in central Cambridge that isn’t using an amplifier. I ask cautiously about his opinion of the university students, rightly expecting a negative response, but Cavey tells me “nine-nine point nine percent of it has been absolutely positive. If a busker played the same thirty or so songs outside my bedroom window, and it’s not just a bedroom, it’s like their flat, it’s their bedsit – for a year, I would understand, I can completely empathise with their annoyance. Sadly their reactions have let them down, but it’s only a handful. And it’s really only going to be these guys who live here. And it’s alright, it happens, it’s merely a lack of ability to communicate on their part.”

I ask him what’s changed over the years, if reactions and song choices have evolved, but he is most frustrated about the evolution of bin design. He used to busk by on Bridge Street and pick which one to play in at random, “I used to use them all along that street, it didn’t matter, it depended on how I felt that day. Then one day I turned up and they were moving them all. They were replacing them, I don’t know how long you’ve been here but before they were aluminium they were fibreglass and so I had to buy my own.”

The last twenty years have witnessed a series of bins and music, but Cavey’s career does not consist of just busking: “for the last four years before lockdown I ran a kids music club called Mr Baboon’s Dancing Tunes and I’ve managed to find a proper job Monday to Friday now at the school where my kids attend.” Cavey seems incredibly content with his lifestyle; he’s not interested in releasing music or changing careers anytime soon. “I started to realise how much fun it really is, because I’m forty-two and just through wisdom and having lots of other jobs I’ve kind of realised that this is one of the nicest ways to live, the money might be less but the lifestyle is better. Because I get out of bed when I want, I start when I want…I don’t answer to anybody and I get to play music and make people happy which is pretty ideal for me.”

“I’ve kind of realised that this is one of the nicest ways to live, the money might be less but the lifestyle is better”

I ask if this lifestyle is a heavily communal one, if there is camaraderie or competition between the buskers. He’s not massively involved: “because I’ve got two children of my own, I come into town, busk and go home. I know a few of them, though having seen them and liked what they’d done and gone over and introduced myself. But maybe three or four, there probably is a nice community and there are a lot, you’ll see a lot more a lot closer to summer.”

I’m sorry, I couldn’t resist…Ruyi Rix

His laid back attitude is admirable, and a career in busking seems to never afford a dull moment. In fact, he’s met Bob Geldof, Carol Vorderman, Gregory Porter. Crowds of people take an interest in his unusual busking format and remember him for summers to come, partly because of the unusual format of the bin, but also because it is clear that this is someone who does what they love, however eccentric. Love him or hate him, he’ll never know anyway, in his continual unflappable way he tells me,“I turned the news off eight or nine years ago. I hear everything from mouth, it makes it a much nicer world.”

References

  1. ^ Tyson Fury was seen singing along to Oasis (www.cambridge-news.co.uk)
  2. ^ A Tab article in 2016 (thetab.com)
  3. ^ students were reprimanded by colleges (www.huffingtonpost.co.uk)

‘I’m no hero’, says M62 trucker who helped save man on motorway

The truck driver hailed a hero[1] after parking his vehicle under a bridge on the M62[2] to stop a man from jumping has said ‘I’m not the hero of this story’.

Tom Birkett, 35, received praise from across the nation[3] after a picture showing his truck trailer parked directly underneath the man sat on the edge of the bridge went viral.

The man’s mother, who did not wish to be named, has since spoken out to let Tom know how grateful she is[4] as she is convinced he saved her son, who had been struggling with his mental health. She also said that he is now receiving help.

But Tom’s refuses to believe he is a hero, instead praising the police for the way they handled the situation.

READ MORE: Greater Manchester’s latest coronavirus infection rates[5]

Speaking to Leeds Live[6], the husband and father of three said: “All I did was park the truck under the bridge.

“This is something that the police and charities are deal with. I got an opportunity to do my little bit but it was 0.01 per cent of what other people did.

“I basically figured out something I could do, I did my good deed for the day. The police are the ones that saved him.

“I’m not the hero of this story, I’m happy with being called a Good Samaritan.”

Recalling how the events unfolded, Tom said spotted three people on the bridge from a distance and felt that “something was not right”.

As he got closer, he noticed that one person was on the wrong side of the bars and saw his legs dangling off the bridge.

Tom, from Kendal, Cumbria, quickly moved into the hard shoulder and put on his hazard lights to alert other road users.

After parking the trailer which has a soft top, he let officers who were at the scene know what he had done.

Helplines and websites

Samaritans (116 123) samaritans.org operates a 24-hour service available every day of the year. If you prefer to write down how you’re feeling, or if you’re worried about being overheard on the phone, you can email Samaritans at [email protected][7] , write to Freepost RSRB-KKBY-CYJK, PO Box 9090, STIRLING, FK8 2SA and visit www.samaritans.org/branches to find your nearest branch.

For support for people feeling suicidal, if you are concerned about someone or if you are bereaved by suicide see http://shiningalightonsuicide.org.uk[8]

CALM (0800 58 58 58) thecalmzone.net has a helpline is for men who are down or have hit a wall for any reason, who need to talk or find information and support. They’re open 5pm to midnight, 365 days a year.

Greater Manchester Bereavement Service Greater Manchester Bereavement Service can help to find support for anyone in Greater Manchester that has been bereaved or affected by a death. No one needs to feel alone as they deal with their grief. www.greater-manchester-bereavement-service.org.uk[9]

Childline (0800 1111 ) runs a helpline for children and young people in the UK. Calls are free and the number won’t show up on your phone bill.

PAPYRUS (0800 068 41 41) is a voluntary organisation supporting teenagers and young adults who are feeling suicidal.

Beat Eating Disorders: Beat provides helplines for adults and young people offering support and information about eating disorders. These helplines are free to call from all phones. Adult Helpline: 0808 801 0677, Studentline: 0808 801 0811, Youthline: 0808 801 0711. www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk[10]

Anorexia & Bulimia Care: ABC provide on-going care, emotional support and practical guidance for anyone affected by eating disorders, those struggling personally and parents, families and friends. Helpline: 03000 11 12 13. www.anorexiabulimiacare.org.uk/[11]

Students Against Depression is a website for students who are depressed, have a low mood or are having suicidal thoughts. Bullying UK is a website for both children and adults affected by bullying studentsagainstdepression.org[12]

For information and links to charities and organisations that can help with substance abuse, visit https://www.supportline.org.uk/problems/drugs/[13]

Tom, who was speaking to his friend on the phone during his journey on Junction 9 on the M62, said: “I clocked him, I had seen something not right from a distance, obviously as a truck driver you’re looking way ahead of everyone else.

“I had seen three people on the bridge and I just knew something didn’t seem right. Something seemed off, the spacing of the people – you see truck spotters on bridges.

“As I was getting closer. I saw the person in the middle on the wrong side of the bars sat down with legs dangling on the motorway. The two police on the other side, that’s what I could see. I just said to my mate, I think he’s going to jump, I’m going to have to go.

“I just did what I did.

“That was it, I walked up to the other side of the embankment and told the officers what I had done.

“I was sat for two hours just talking to the police.”

Asked if he had a message for the man, Tom, who runs a Trucking YouTube page called Except for Access[14], added: “All I can say is I wish him the best and he gets through it.

“I’ve never quite been as bad as the position he was in but I know that helplessness though. Many people have felt that helplessness but not many people like to admit it.”

References

  1. ^ hailed a hero (www.leeds-live.co.uk)
  2. ^ M62 (www.leeds-live.co.uk)
  3. ^ praise from across the nation (www.leeds-live.co.uk)
  4. ^ how grateful she is (www.examinerlive.co.uk)
  5. ^ Greater Manchester’s latest coronavirus infection rates (www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk)
  6. ^ Leeds Live (www.leeds-live.co.uk)
  7. ^ [email protected] (www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk)
  8. ^ http://shiningalightonsuicide.org.uk (t.co)
  9. ^ www.greater-manchester-bereavement-service.org.uk (www.greater-manchester-bereavement-service.org.uk)
  10. ^ www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk (www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk)
  11. ^ www.anorexiabulimiacare.org.uk/ (www.anorexiabulimiacare.org.uk)
  12. ^ studentsagainstdepression.org (www.google.com)
  13. ^ https://www.supportline.org.uk/problems/drugs/ (www.supportline.org.uk)
  14. ^ Except for Access (www.youtube.com)

Tesco suppliers forced to bin nearly 50 tonnes of food each week due to lorry driver ‘crisis’

Tesco suppliers are being forced to bin nearly 50 tonnes of fresh food every week because there are too few lorry drivers to transport produce to stores.

Around 48 tonnes of food – enough to fill two trucks – destined for Tesco is being thrown away every week as a result of a severe shortage of heavy goods vehicle drivers in the UK.

The admission, first reported by industry publication The Grocer[1], was made during an industry-wide round-table organised by the Department for Transport and marks the first time a supermarket chain has broken cover to lay out to Government the extent to which the lack of drivers is affecting the food and drink sector.

It comes after i revealed that some products have begun disappearing from shelves[2] and prices are likely to increase because of the of the severe driver shortage.

Suppliers are being forced to delay or cancel thousands delivery loads every week to supermarkets and restaurants because haulage firms cannot find enough drivers to transport the produce.

The shelf-life of fresh produce is reduced and can spoil before it even leaves the wholesalers while Supermarkets often deem short-dated goods delivered late to distribution centres and stores unsellable.  

More than 65,000 HGV drivers are needed to make up for the shortfall, according to the Road Haulage Association[3].

The crisis is so severe one leading industry figure has called for the Government to put the Army on standby to transport food if the situation worsens.

“The situation has reached crisis point and it is likely to get worse as more hospitality venues open and demand increases,” said James Bielby, chief executive officer of the Federation of Wholesale Distributors.

“We are concerned enough to suggest that the Government considers having Army trucks on standby to ensure there are enough vehicles and drivers to distribute food.”

The shortage has been attributed to a combination of factors including Brexit, which led to an exodus of EU-based drivers, tax changes, which have driven up hauliers costs and a lack of driver training and tests during the pandemic preventing newcomers from joining the workforce.

@kt_grant[4]

References

  1. ^ The Grocer (www.thegrocer.co.uk)
  2. ^ some products have begun disappearing from shelves (inews.co.uk)
  3. ^ Road Haulage Association (www.rha.uk.net)
  4. ^ @kt_grant (twitter.com)