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Cargo Shipping Market Industry Overview, Trends and Growth Opportunities Forecasted till 2023

“Cargo Shipping Market” Cargo Shipping Market by Cargo Type, by Industry, by Region – Forecast to 2023 Market research future published a raw research report on Global Cargo Shipping Market[1] that contains the information from 2017 to 2023.

The cargo shipping is expected to grow with the CAGR of approximately 3.45% from 2017 to 2023. Taste the market data and market information presented through more than 85 market data tables and figures spread in 118 numbers of pages of the project report. Avail the in-depth table of content TOC & market synopsis on “Global Cargo Shipping Market Information from 2017 to 2023

Receive Sample [email protected] https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/sample_request/3165[2] The factors which are expected to boost the global cargo shipping market include trade liberalization and increasing investment in port infrastructure. Furthermore, Urbanization has been one of the most important driving forces for global cargo shipping market in recent years.

Cities are consuming the majority of global power and resources, while generating major chunk of GDP. Urbanization often supplements and facilitates economic shift from agriculture to manufacturing, industrial production and services. These activities tend to demand clusters of labor and capital, thereby boosting demand for seaborne trade.

However, high cost of buying new bigger container ships with further task to fill them in a saturated and competitive market is one of the major restraints of the market, which has started to consolidate the industry. The global cargo shipping market is expected to grow over the CAGR of around 3.45% during the period 2017 to 2023. The report has analyzed the market based on the three segments, namely cargo type, industry and region.

On the basis of cargo type, the market is segmented as container cargo, bulk cargo and general cargo. Among these, container cargo accounted for the largest market share due to increasing adoption of container transportation to transport goods, which also acts as a major driver for the cargo shipping market in both developed and developing countries. Furthermore, the increasing investments in port infrastructure, global supply & demand cycle are expected to boost the container transport.

In 2016, Asia-Pacific has accounted for the largest share for container transport segment followed by Europe. Access Report Details @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/cargo-shipping-market-3165[3] Based on industry, the market is bifurcated as food, manufacturing, oil & ores, electrical & electronics.

In which, food is expected to dominate the market during the forecast period owing to factors such as economic growth and development, thereby directly increasing commodity consumption, which further drives the cargo shipping market. Ask for your specific company profile and country level customization on reports.

  • A.P. Moller-Maersk Group (Denmark)
  • Mediterranean Shipping Company S.A. (Switzerland)
  • Panalpina World Transport (Holding) Ltd. (Switzerland)
  • CMA-CGM SA (France)
  • DHL Global Forwarding (Germany)
  • China COSCO Holdings Company Limited (China)
  • Nippon Express Co., Ltd. (Japan)
  • Deutsche Bahn AG (Germany)
  • Hapag-Lloyd AG (Germany)
  • Panalpina Welttransport Holding AG (Switzerland)

This research report has provides the insights, on various levels of analyses such industry analysis, market share analysis leading market players and their profiles.

This report also helps in studying the target segments by providing views on emerging & high-growth segments and market conclusion. Together the market data comprise and discuss with the basic assessments on the competitive scenarios & strategies, of the global cargo shipping market, including the high-growth regions, countries and their political, economic and technological environments. Furthermore the project report also provides the views over the historical market values as well as, pricing and cost analysis of the same.

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MRFR team have supreme objective to provide the optimum quality market research and intelligence services to our clients. Our market research studies by Components, Application, Logistics and market players for global, regional, and country level market segments, enable our clients to see more, know more, and do more, which help to answer all their most important questions.

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References

  1. ^ Global Cargo Shipping Market (www.marketresearchfuture.com)
  2. ^ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/sample_request/3165 (www.marketresearchfuture.com)
  3. ^ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/cargo-shipping-market-3165 (www.marketresearchfuture.com)
  4. ^ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/enquiry/3165 (www.marketresearchfuture.com)
  5. ^ [email protected] (www.digitaljournal.com)
  6. ^ Send Email (www.universalpressrelease.com)
  7. ^ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/cargo-shipping-market-3165 (www.marketresearchfuture.com)

Rubber hits the road on the fourth transport revolution

LEON NEAL/GETTY IMAGES

The New Zealand Transport Agency has begun thinking about how it may need to prepare for the arrival of autonomous vehicles such as this Volkswagen driverless concept car. The transport revolutions of the past – railways, petrol cars and air travel – have shaped our cities and driven some of the most sudden and dramatic changes in society. So it’s probably no wonder that transport is one of the first things we consider when we think about future technology.

In a few short years, people have gone from debating about whether electric cars will take off at all, to arguing about whether and when they will be self-driving. Meanwhile, the leading edge of transport research and development has skipped ahead a mile. READ MORE
* US company offers new look at prototype flying car
* Flying taxis showcase New Zealand as a global tech incubator
* Petrol cars could vanish as quickly as the horse and carriage
* NZ’s 15,000 motor mechanics get ready for the electric vehicle era[1][2][3][4]

Last month, Uber began laying the groundwork for a fleet of autonomous electronic helicopters or drones that would ferry commuters between the rooftops of skyscrapers, so they could bypass congested city streets. The company aims to have a commercial service operating in Dallas and Dubai by 2023. One vehicle that could perhaps do the job is being trialled in – who would have guessed it – New Zealand.

United States company Kitty Hawk, funded by Google co-founder Larry Page, has been testing a self-driving “flying car” called Cora, which can take off and land vertically, in Canterbury since October.

Kitty Hawk

Cora is being tested in NZ by Kitty Hawk’s Kiwi company Zephyr Airworks. Spokeswoman Anna Kominik said it had settled on New Zealand for the trials after a global search for a jurisdiction that was “safe, had aviation experience and was a good place to do business”.

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Kitty Hawk is headed by former Google X scientist Sebastian Thrun, who led the development of Google’s self-driving car and its Google Glass augmented-reality spectacles. Its website explains Cora “rises like a helicopter and flies like a plane, eliminating the need for a runway and creating the possibility of taking off from places like rooftops”.

Kitty Hawk assumes Cora will be used for an Uber-like “ride-sharing” flying-electric-car service, rather than being a modern take on the exclusive corporate helicopter. The Cora won’t be available for sale to individuals, it says, and is instead “about giving everyone a fast and easy way to get around that doesn’t come at the expense of the planet”. However, Kitty Hawk is also trialling a one-person vertical take-off “personal aircraft” called the Flyer that is designed to fly up to 10 kilometres on a single electric charge.

Rubber hits the road on the fourth transport revolution

The Flyer is designed to travel for up to 20 minutes at 20 miles per hour, though it’s currently limited to flying over water at an altitude of only 10 feet.

Coming back down to earth – but not with a bump – Telsa founder Elon Musk envisages a network of “hyperloops” that would smoothly whisk people between cities at up to 1200kmh, which is just under the speed of sound. The incredibly high speeds touted by hyperloop researchers are conceivable because people would travel in pressurised “pods” that would glide on magnets, pushed by magnetic pulses through tubes that were kept at a near-vacuum to reduce air resistance. One of the huge (some think insurmountable) engineering challenges is creating and maintaining something close to a vacuum in tubes that could stretch hundreds of miles.

Without the near vacuum, hyperloops just become a bit like a Maglev train in a tube. Virgin founder Sir Richard Branson has signed a “preliminary agreement” to build a hyperloop that would transport people 160 kilometres between the Indian cities of Pune and Mumbai in 25 minutes, implying a less whizzy average speed of about 350kmh. Its tubes would be depressurised to about 100Pa (pascals), equivalent to the very thin air pressure that exists 60km above the ground.

Branson, who has come off the bench to personally chair his Virgin Hyperloop 1 venture, told the BBC he believed it could transport people in Britain “far quicker, in far greater numbers, with far greater convenience than any other train network in the UK”.

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If ever built in New Zealand, a hyperloop could cut the land-travel time between Auckland and Wellington to under an hour, and the commute time between Hamilton and Auckland to less than 10 minutes. KiwiRail general manager of planning David Gordon says KiwiRail “has not formally looked at hyperloop technology for New Zealand and has not formed any view on it”. Compared with drone taxis and hyperloops, self-driving cars might sound positively pedestrian.

But Christchurch consultant Roger Dennis is one of a growing number of professional future-watchers who argue they are an advance we can definitely count on. Dennis forecasts self-driving trucks and cars will first prove their safety in the confines of mines, university campuses, ports and hospitals before being gradually allowed onto public roads by regulators. Tragedies such as the death in March of a pedestrian in Arizona, who was hit by an Uber vehicle travelling in autonomous mode, will prove only an unfortunate “blip”, he believes.

“Driverless trucks have been used in mines for a number of years and, when they remove the human driver, accidents go down and productivity goes up. Human-driven cars kill more people every year than autonomous cars ever will.” Self-driving cars may not be given licence to roam all of New Zealand’s eclectic mix of public roads in one swoop.

Regulators may instead open up the road network in phases, he says. “A logical approach would be to say, ‘We think these roads are suitable for autonomous vehicles and there’s another set of roads where it won’t work’. Then, as artificial intelligence improves, you will see more and more roads become certified.”

The New Zealand Transport Agency is starting to prepare for the arrival of autonomous vehicles (AVs), says one of its managers, Martin McMullan.

Rubber hits the road on the fourth transport revolution

Virgin is one of the companies pioneering hyperloop systems, which could let people travel on land at up to 1200 kilometres an hour. Trans-Tasman body Austroads, on which the agency has a board seat, produced a report last year on changes that might be required to the road network. It stressed the benefits of making intersection designs and machine-readable signs “consistent”, so they could be reliably interpreted by software.

“Feedback suggests that many AVs will be designed to operate on our road networks as they currently are”, but existing infrastructure was “problematic” for some manufacturers, the report concluded. “Roadworks are a key aspect noted to be of particular concern to AV manufacturers and system suppliers. It is necessary to ensure that roadworks become well planned events.”

Colin Gavaghan, director of the New Zealand Law Foundation Centre for Law and Policy in Emerging Technologies at Otago University, says it’s only “human” for AV accidents to weigh heavily on our minds. “I’d wager that one pedestrian death from a driverless car would stand out in people’s minds more than all of the 300-odd road deaths in New Zealand last year combined.” People imagine they are safer when they are in control of a vehicle, and “no amount of actuarial data can budge that belief”, he says.

“That said, I’m not sure that we should be settling for ‘a bit better than the status quo’ if it’s reasonable to expect driverless cars to be much safer. “I have a vision of a future where car deaths are as rare as air traffic deaths today, and we should be demanding that level of safety.” Research firm Bloomberg argues the world is unlikely to run out of lithium before the electric vehicle (EV) revolution is complete, even if it remains an essential ingredient in batteries.

Although not super-abundant, lithium is not a “rare earth” metal, with discovered global recoverable reserves estimated at somewhere between 10 million and 40m tonnes and rising – potentially enough to power more than 10 billion electric cars, according to Bloomberg. Neither would New Zealand be likely to run out of electricity, according to Electricity Authority chief executive Carl Hansen. “Electrifying all light vehicles would increase electricity demand by approximately 15 per cent, but this will likely occur over several decades,” Hansen says.

“We’re confident that the industry can cope with building generation in a timely way to meet the demand increases.” Electricity prices might not even need to go up. “Over this time period there’s a high chance that electricity prices will decline in real terms due to the declining costs of technology such as small-scale solar generation.” The same is true for transmission costs, he says. “It is possible the average cost of delivering electricity to consumers could decline due to higher use of existing network assets, especially during off-peak hours.

“Electric vehicles offer a fantastic opportunity for New Zealand to reduce its transport-related carbon emissions.”

Rubber hits the road on the fourth transport revolutionMARK TANTRUM/STUFF

Tony Seba believes petrol cars will go the way of the “horse and cart” far faster than most planners expect. There is less agreement on when EVs and AVs may take over. Right now, the switch to conventional self-driven electric vehicles has only just begun.

At the end of May, there were 5984 EVs registered in New Zealand, not including plug-in hybrids, according to the Transport Ministry. That’s up from just 735 two years before and 2444 a year ago, but still a drop in the ocean among the total fleet of 3.6 million light vehicles. Stanford University economist Tony Seba turned heads at an Apec conference in Wellington in November when he forecast no petrol vehicles would be built after 2025.

He believes that, by 2030, most journeys in the US will be taken “Uber-style” in fleets of self-driving cars that will pick people up and drop them off. In the US “200m cars are going to be stranded – useless”, said Seba, who is known for his bold forecasts. At the conservative end of the spectrum, the Transport Ministry forecasts EVs will still only make up 40 per cent of the fleet by 2040, even though it believes the typical lifetime cost of owning an EV will fall below that of a petrol car equivalent by about 2025.

The ministry is not making any forecasts about self-driving cars. But McMullan says if AVs follow the pattern of other vehicle technologies they will take between 10 and 30 years to dominate vehicle sales, and then at least a further 20 years to squeeze out the existing fleet. Dennis – noticing a Tesla electric car pass by his window as he speaks – says the “safe money” is on it being eight to 15 years before AVs become noticeable on the roads.

“The two big barriers will be that the last 20 per cent of the technology challenge will be difficult, and regulation and public policy.” The obvious roadblock for drone transport and electrically powered flight in general comes in inventing the battery technology that could provide the necessary power-to-weight ratios. British vacuum cleaning inventor James Dyson announced Dyson’s move into the electric-vehicle business last year and is among those betting big on new solid-state batteries that would have a solid electrolyte instead of the conventional liquid one.

Last month, carmakers Toyota, Nissan and Honda and battery manufacturers Panasonic and GS Yuasa received a US£14m grant from the Japanese government to team up on solid-state battery research. These could at least double power-to-weight ratios at the same time as slashing recharge times by a factor of six, according to some researchers. Dennis says there is “always interesting stuff in the labs”, but cautions battery technology has not been a fast-moving field, at least up to now.

A “10-year timeframe” would be realistic for any breakthroughs, he believes. “I think everybody finds it really difficult to think long term, and the classic example of this is the rebuilding of Christchurch, New Zealand’s largest infrastructure project costing more than £40b. “There are at least four new car parking buildings in the CBD, yet if you look at Oslo in Norway, their CBD is going to be car-free by 2020.

These are multi-storey buildings whose usage will probably start to tail off in 10 to 15 years – maybe sooner.”

– Stuff

References

  1. ^ US company offers new look at prototype flying car (www.stuff.co.nz)
  2. ^ Flying taxis showcase New Zealand as a global tech incubator (www.stuff.co.nz)
  3. ^ Petrol cars could vanish as quickly as the horse and carriage (www.stuff.co.nz)
  4. ^ NZ’s 15,000 motor mechanics get ready for the electric vehicle era (www.stuff.co.nz)
  5. ^ Ad Feedback (stuff.co.nz)

EU road safety plans ‘needed to go further’

Published: 08:30 Sunday 17 June 2018 Share this article

A new package of EU transport proposals that promise to revolutionise road safety in coming years has been welcomed by IAM RoadSmart. But the road safety charity believes that a ‘huge opportunity’ has been missed by not specifically including driver training.

The Third Mobility Package has been put forward by the European Commission. It includes proposals for new safety features to be fitted on all new cars being sold across the EU (see below). Road traffic accidents remain the biggest killer of young people in the EU – 23,500 people lost their lives on EU roads in 2017.

This means the EU’s vision of halving road fatalities between 2010 and 2020 is now looking tough to achieve. The commission has proposed a policy framework for 2021 to 2030 to respond to the new challenges in road safety based on the ‘Safe System’ approach. It aims for a more forgiving road system, designed to protect people from death and serious injury.

But IAM RoadSmart is disappointed the EU has not embedded driver training in its policy framework. Research boss Neil Greig said: “The directive and measures suggested here are very welcome, but as we often say the key to accident prevention is to stop them happening in the first place. It would have been very useful to have worked in a requirement for a graduated driving licence scheme that also includes a second phase of training post-test.

“New drivers are most at risk in the first six months of solo driving and many EU countries, including the UK, simply abandon them to learn from their own mistakes. “Saving people’s lives on the road cannot be left to the car alone. New technology brings many benefits but also requires new training approaches to ensure that those benefits are maximised.

Safer cars require safer drivers as well as safer roads to ensure the system delivers the excellent targets set by the EU for a further 50 per cent reduction in deaths by 2030.”

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