driving

Shop’s lorry parks in road after bollards put on pavement

A Gloucester shop’s delivery lorry was photographed parked in a busy main road unloading after the council stopped them from parking on the pavement.

Bollards were installed[1] outside the Biedronki shop to stop “dangerous” parking on the pavement by the lorry and customers, at the beginning of the month on June 5.

The Polish grocery shop in Barton Street[2] has been caught up in a parking row since December, after an elderly man collapsed[3] trying to squeeze past the parked vehicles crowding the pavement.

Read more: Shopkeeper receives racist comments over parking row[4]

Concerns were also rained for pram and wheelchair users who were forced to cross the blind and busy bend.

The shop’s general manager Michael Radoszko, 35, has been against Gloucestershire County Council’s actions to install bollards there without an accessible loading bay for his shop.

The lorry was photographed in the carriageway at 3.45pm on Thursday, June 17, by a frustrated resident who claims it was there for 15 minutes.

Get the biggest stories from across Gloucestershire straight to your inbox, click here[5]

Cars were seen queuing on either side of the lorry on the bend, having to take turns driving around.

This comes after the council advised the shop to have their delivery vans park behind a nearby bus stop away from the narrowest part of the road.

‘Very very dangerous’

Biedronki shop
‘I fear for the drivers,’ said a concerned resident (Image: Ebrahim Moosajee)

Resident Ebrahim Moosajee, who lives opposite to the shop, said: “It was very busy. I saw cars coming up both lanes. They were having to wait either side of the lorry for cars to go past on each side.

“That was worse than before when the bollards weren’t there because it was actually blocking the road, can you imagine if emergency services had been there? That was a p*** take, to be honest.

“There’s no respect from the driver and the shop knows he has parked there so there is no consideration from the shop again. They’re disrespecting council regulations where they have offered them space to park just behind the bus stop.

“It’s very very dangerous, I fear for the drivers now. People can walk around. My concerns are more for the drivers now who have to stop on the road, just to wait for this lorry to go past.”

Shopkeeper fears having to close shop

Michael Radoszko, general manager of Polish grocery shop Biedronki in Barton Street
Michael Radoszko was advised to have his delivery lorries park behind this bus stop (Image: Samuel Port)

Biedronki shopkeeper Mr Radoszko said the delivery driver was unaware of the new rules. He claims the driver delivered three pallets of stock and was there for ten minutes.

Mr Radoszko said: “We are still waiting for a response from Highways [Gloucestershire County Council] to find a solution safer for everybody and we will teach our delivery lorries to park as safely as possible.

“If not, I am very worried I will be forced to close the store and over 20 people will lose their jobs.”

‘Risk to human life and limbs’

Before and after bollards were installed infront of Biedronki (Image: Ebrahim Moosajee)

Councillor Usman Bhaimia (L, Barton and Tredworth) said: “The council should have negotiated with the shop beforehand.

“But I do not support deliveries like this, it is a risk to human life and limbs. I don’t want anyone to get hurt there. The parking there is wrong.

“When planning permission was originally given to the shop, they should have taken into consideration the parking problem. It’s a risk to passers-by, the pedestrians.”

The unit space the shop now inhabits was originally designed as a car show room.

‘We will closely monitor the area,’ vows council

Delivery lorry parked on carriageway outside Biedronki shop in Barton Street
The council says it will continue to work with the community (Image: Ebrahim Moosajee)

Gloucestershire County Council has vowed to “closely monitor the area” after they saw the pictures. The local authority said unattended lorries on double yellow lines “can affect visibility” for pedestrians and road users.

A Gloucestershire County Council spokesperson said: “In line with the current restrictions, loading and unloading activity can take place outside of the peak hours of 8am-9am and 5pm-6pm.

“We have advised that an area next to the bus stop may be more suitable as it is away from the narrowest section of the road, whilst parking considerately to maintain access for local bus services.

“Lorries should not be left parked and unattended on the yellow lines however, as this can affect visibility for passing traffic and people crossing the road.

“Now the bollards have been installed and lorries are stopping in the carriageway, we will closely monitor the area to ensure the safety of pedestrians and motorists and will continue to work with the local community to see what else can be done to help.”

References

  1. ^ were installed (www.gloucestershirelive.co.uk)
  2. ^ Barton Street (www.gloucestershirelive.co.uk)
  3. ^ elderly man collapsed (www.gloucestershirelive.co.uk)
  4. ^ Shopkeeper receives racist comments over parking row (www.gloucestershirelive.co.uk)
  5. ^ click here (http)

‘Aggressive’ BMW driver overtook lorry before slamming on brakes in front of it

A man drove his BMW car “aggressively” on a rural road, overtaking a 44-tonne HGV lorry then slamming on his brakes in front of it.

A court heard the potential for damage in any accident on the main Denbigh[1] to Ruthin road was “huge”.

Mark Morris, 35, today pleaded guilty at Llandudno Magistrates Court to driving without due care and attention in the incident on the A525 in Llandegla.

READ MORE: Picture shows aftermath of serious barn fire caused by grinder sparks[2]

Magistrates disqualified Morris from driving for six months and fined him £162.

Prosecutor Julia Galston told the court that Aled Davies had been driving his 44-tonne vehicle in the Llanrhaeadr area on August 13 last year.

She said he became aware of a blue BMW in his rear dashcam “swerving” in the road and trying to overtake him.

The prosecutor said he eventually crossed the double white lines on a bend and overtook him.

She said: “Mr Morris then slammed the brakes on” causing Mr Davies to brake.

The court heard that someone in the BMW’s front passenger seat then wound down their window and made “gestures” at the lorry driver.

Further along the road, the lorry stopped and Morris in the BMW also stopped at the Drovers Arms pub.

“The defendant ran down the road and shouted abuse (towards Mr Davies),” said the prosecutor.

The prosecution played two clips from the lorry’s front and rear dash cameras to the court showing the incident.

Ms Galston said the “potential for damage was huge”.

FREE Court newsletter and Facebook group

General view of Caernarfon Crown Court, Caernarfon Justice Centre. Photo by Ian Cooper

You can now get the latest reports from courts in North Wales delivered straight to your inbox – and it’s all for free.

We’ll send you a roundup of the latest cases from our reporters in the courts at Caernarfon[3], Llandudno[4] and Mold[5].

We’ll only send you one e-mail a week and it’s free to signup.

For more information about how to subscribe click here[6].

If you have a Facebook account, you can join our private North Wales Court Reports Facebook group[7] to read the latest court cases. 

Chris Dawson, defending, said his client, of Lynton Ridge, Llandegla, initially believed that the lorry driver was the “villain of the piece”.

He accepted that it was “inappropriate” for Morris to go over the double white lines to overtake the lorry and it had been “aggressive” driving.

However, Mr Dawson added: “Whatever the potential for an accident resulting from Mr Morris’s manoeuvres in fact there wasn’t an accident and no-one was injured.”

The solicitor said any driving ban would cause Morris, who has five dependent children, “exceptional hardship” as they live in a rural location and need to attend appointments.

Both Morris – who has three forklift truck and excavator driving licences – and his partner gave evidence to back up this claim.

But chairman of the bench Peter Campbell noted the aggressive manner of driving on a road with a “high level of traffic”.

He handed the defendant the ban adding: “We do not find that you have demonstrated exceptional hardship – rather, inconvenience.

“This is down to the fact that there is another adult (his partner) available to drive.”

He added that arrangements can be made with the NHS for patients to go to any hospital appointments.

Have your say on this story in the comments section.

References

  1. ^ Denbigh (www.dailypost.co.uk)
  2. ^ Picture shows aftermath of serious barn fire caused by grinder sparks (www.dailypost.co.uk)
  3. ^ Caernarfon (www.dailypost.co.uk)
  4. ^ Llandudno (www.dailypost.co.uk)
  5. ^ Mold (www.dailypost.co.uk)
  6. ^ click here (www.dailypost.co.uk)
  7. ^ North Wales Court Reports Facebook group (www.facebook.com)

A1 closure sparks worries of stuck lorries

The county council is asking lorry drivers to be “extra cautious” when they are diverted through the centre of Grantham after a large vehicle became stuck and traffic lights were damaged.

Traffic is being diverted off the A1 at Grantham[1] overnight for work to be carried out as part of the construction of the new southern relief road.

But there have been complaints about lorries getting stuck[2] at the junction of Westgate and Dysart Road in Grantham town centre and damage to traffic lights. Local resident Paul Hodges complained of traffic building up in the town centre when a lorry with an abnormal load got stuck outside his home for an hour.

Paul Hodges took this picture of the lorry trying to negotiate the corner of Dysart Road and Westgate. (48097138)

Paul Hodges took this picture of the lorry trying to negotiate the corner of Dysart Road and Westgate. (48097138)

Paul Hodges took this picture of the lorry trying to negotiate the corner of Dysart Road and Westgate. (48097138)

In response to the complaints Lincolnshire County Council highways department says it is asking lorry drivers to be ‘extra cautious’ while driving through the town centre.

Councillor Richard Davies, executive member for highways, said: “We understand the questions and concerns residents have about the HGV diversion route in place for our final set of night-time A1 works.

“This route was selected because the A606/A607 was not available to us due to other works in the area. The diversion we are using also saves drivers over thirty minutes compared to using the A606/A607, meaning all A1 users are less affected by our night-time closures.

“These A1 closures are still on track to finish in September. In the meantime, we ask all lorry drivers to be extra cautious when driving through Grantham and to contact Galliford Try if they are carrying an abnormal load so they can discuss alternative options with the team in advance.

“I also want to thank residents for staying patient throughout these works and understanding the benefits the new relief road will bring Grantham when it’s fully opened in 2023.”



References

  1. ^ diverted off the A1 at Grantham (www.granthamjournal.co.uk)
  2. ^ complaints about lorries getting stuck (www.granthamjournal.co.uk)

Driver shortage causes UK supply crisis

A shortage of lorry drivers is resulting in fresh produce being dumped or left to rot in cold stores, while supermarket shelves and restaurant plates go empty, produce suppliers and retailers warn.

The driver deficit – the worst in over 20 years, according to driver recruitment agency Driver Require – is the result of an exodus of EU drivers post-Brexit and government failure to recruit a replacement workforce. The coronavirus pandemic, which has prevented driving tests and training for over a year, as well as a hike in driver costs, has exacerbated the shortfall.

Haulage companies are therefore struggling to deliver goods – either imported or domestically produced – to UK retailers and restaurants, causing delays and product losses, and empty plates and shelves, distributors say.

Tesco, the UK’s biggest supermarket chain, is understood to have informed the UK Government’s Department of Transport that its suppliers are being forced to bin nearly 50 tonnes of fresh food every week because there are too few lorry drivers to transport produce to stores.

Meanwhile, the Federation of Wholesale Distributors (FWD) is so concerned that it has urged the government to consider having Army trucks on standby to ensure there are enough vehicles and drivers to distribute food.

“It’s shocking, but it’s true. The acute shortage of HGV drivers is now the direct cause of perfectly good, graded and packed fresh produce being dumped or left rotting in coldstores,” Tim O’Malley, managing director of major UK produce distributor Nationwide Produce, told FPJ. “In all my years in fresh produce I’ve never seen anything like this. Goods are being produced, but not delivered.”

The current situation – dubbed a national crisis by some suppliers – is predicted to get worse as the UK continues to open up after lockdown, and demand increases from hospitality and retail.

Brexit clearance issues and a global shortage of shipping containers are further deepening transport problems for imported produce, one source told FPJ.

“The driver shortage has reached crisis point for some of our members and we believe it is likely to get worse as more hospitality venues open and demand increases,” said FWD chief executive James Bielby.

“With the estimated 70,000 shortfall in HGV drivers, some wholesalers have had to limit the number of deliveries they make to convenience stores which has led to some availability issues.

“We’ve asked the government to re-instate the temporary extension of drivers’ hours (from 9 to 11) which was in place last year but ended recently. Other proposals we are putting forward include ending furlough for HGV drivers, temporarily waiving requirements for medical certs and CPC for those which have run out, and using army drivers to deliver to vulnerable communities.”

Meanwhile, in an open letter to the FPJ, Nationwide Produce’s O’Malley urged produce industry suppliers to work with hauliers and customers to get through this crisis.

“I would urge you not to shout at your hauliers and threaten them with bills, as that will get you nowhere – work with them to find solutions,” he wrote. “Customers will have to be far more flexible on delivery times. We also need to stop hauling fresh air around the country. Full pallets and full loads are what we need in a crisis like this.”

O’Malley added that customers need to be more flexible on date codes to allow direct deliveries from abroad. “I’m sure this will eventually lead us all to adopt better practices, but for now we need to work together to find a way through this crisis,” he said.

Alex Veitch, general manager – public policy at Logistics UK, added: “With a large pool of potential candidates available, owing to the nation’s higher unemployment, Logistics UK is urging the government to make HGV driver training affordable, accessible and attractive for all. 

“Our 2021 Logistics Report shows that 29 per cent of logistics businesses anticipate that they will be unable to fill vacancies for HGV drivers this year; a further 14.5 per cent expect long delays before filling a role. With the logistics industry in urgent need of these workers, Logistics UK is urging the government to include training for HGV Drivers in their list of courses funded through the National Skills Fund to reskill potential employees and help recruit them into the industry.

“Logistics UK is also urging the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) to maintain its fast-track programme to catch-up on at least 30,000 driving tests that were postponed due to COVID-19 between March and December 2020; this has left thousands of potential HGV drivers waiting in the wings when the UK needs them most to support every facet of UK PLC.”

Coventry lorry driver arrested after cyclist died in crash in Nuneaton this morning

A CYCLIST has died after a crash involving a bike and a lorry in Nuneaton this morning.

The man – believed to be in his 70s – happened in College Street near the junction with Bull Ring at 6.30am.

An ambulance, two paramedic officers and a critical care car from The Air Ambulance Service with a paramedic and doctor on board attended the scene but nothing could be done to save him and he was pronounced dead at the scene.

A 43-year-old man from Coventry has been arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving and driving under the influence of drugs.

Anyone who witnessed the collision or has dash cam footage should call 101 or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.