find

Fury as Amazon lorry driver who rammed van gets off scot-free

The driver of a van which was nearly rammed off the road by an Amazon lorry in Derbyshire says he is furious the man behind the wheel won’t be prosecuted.

Adrian Kowalski was left fearing for his life when the lorry driver tried to run him off the road[1] in a shocking incident on November 18, last year.

The incident, which was caught on dash-cam by a vehicle behind, happened near the M1 at Barlborough, near Bolsover,[2] and saw the driver of the 44-tonne vehicle chase after him and swerve onto the wrong side of the road.

Footage shows the HGV[3] forcing the 52-year-old van driver to take evasive action to avoid a horror crash during the terrifying incident.

Amazon later confirmed the driver of the lorry had been sacked while Derbyshire police investigated.

However, Mr Kowalski, who is from Burton-upon-Trent, says he has been left gobsmacked after learning the driver will not be prosecuted and has been offered a place on a driving course instead.

On Wednesday, May 5, Mr Kowalski said he thought the decision not to prosecute the driver was unduly “lenient” and criticised it for instead offering the driver a spot on a £180 Safe and Considerate Driving course.

the lorry nearly forced the van off the road (Image: Richard Madin / SWNS)

In a letter to Adrian, the Derbyshire police[4] admitted there was enough evidence to justify a prosecution but court action would do nothing “to correct poor driving habits.”

Mr Kowalski said: “You get a worse punishment for doing 36mph in a 30 zone than when you try and ram someone off the road in a 40-tonne vehicle.

“It wasn’t an accident. I remember road rage before used to be quite serious and now it just doesn’t seem to be.

“It just seems like he’s getting away, a half day course just seems very light and lenient.

“I received the letter last week and I thought it would be asking me to come to court. It was a bit of a shock, to be honest.

“I’ve got 14 days to reply if I think there are any mitigating circumstances so I’ve made a few notes and I’m currently deciding what to reply.

“I am definitely going to reply as that’s too lenient for someone who tried to do that.

“He tried to run me off the road and chase me down and was even on the wrong side of the road.

“Even a fine and points would be better than this.

“I think in America it even classes as attempted murder and they would have locked him up.

“I don’t know what the sentence options are but this seems to be so mild. Maybe the courts are backed up and that’s the reason behind it.

“This whole incident has made me wary and I never had a dash-cam till this happened.

Adrian Kowalski, the driver of the van, says he was left shaken by the incident (Image: Adrian Kowalski / SWNS)

“I’m a lot more cautious when I come to junctions and it’s not just about Amazon lorries either.

“I am going to email back as I don’t think it’s right but I want to see if I can find out what the possible sentences are before I go jumping in there.

“I would like to see what the options are but I am not happy.

“I’ve driven for 35 years and never seen anyone in a lorry driving like that – I was absolutely gobsmacked.”

The letter states the driver will be offered the educational course, which he will have to pay for, before completing a practical driver assessment to a satisfactory level.

He will only face prosecution if he refuses to attend the course or is involved in a similar incident three years within three years of its completion.

It states: “Whilst there is sufficient evidence in this case to justify a prosecution, there is no provision in law for a Magistrate to offer such restraining and the imposition of a fine and penalty points will not do anything to correct poor driving habits.”

A Derbyshire Police spokesperson said: “Following an investigation into the incident the driver of the lorry was offered a safe and considerate driving course.

“Derbyshire Constabulary participates in the National Driver Offender Retraining Scheme – which seeks to improve the education of drivers who have committed driving offences.

“Courses are offered to drivers who have committed offences that, after a review, are deemed eligible based on a strict set of national criteria.

“Should the course not be undertaken by a certain date then the matter will be taken to court where a range of further sanctions can be imposed.”

References

  1. ^ when the lorry driver tried to run him off the road (www.derbytelegraph.co.uk)
  2. ^ Bolsover, (www.derbytelegraph.co.uk)
  3. ^ Footage shows the HGV (www.derbytelegraph.co.uk)
  4. ^ Derbyshire police (www.derbytelegraph.co.uk)

EU accuses Jersey of breaching Brexit trade deal over fishing dispute

The authorities in Jersey have promised further talks to help resolve a dispute over fishing rights after a protest by French boats in the Channel Island’s main port.

A new forum bringing together fishing representatives and the Jersey government could be established in an effort to avoid a repeat of Thursday’s drama in the waters around St Helier.

The European Union accused Jersey of breaching the terms of the UK’s post-Brexit trade deal.

The European Commission said the authorities were imposing “additional conditions” on French fishing boats operating there, in breach of the terms of the agreement hammered out on Christmas Eve.

About 60 French fishing boats gathered off the island’s main port, St Helier, early on Thursday, to protest against the new licences they have been required to obtain from the Jersey government to carry on operating.

Two Royal Navy patrol vessels were sent to the area in response to the threat of a blockade of the port.

Local fishermen reported flares were let off and that some boats entered the harbour for about an hour, with footage posted online apparently showing a French boat ramming the rear of a Jersey vessel.

The French maritime authority for the Channel sent two police patrol boats to the area “to ensure the protection of human life at sea”.

French fishing vessels outside the harbour at St Helier (Gary Grimshaw/Bailiwick Express/PA)

The protest leaders denied they were seeking to impose a blockade and the flotilla eventually headed back to France.

The UK Government said the Royal Navy ships would return to port after the French vessels left.

One of the vessels was due to return home on Thursday, with the other heading to port on Friday.

During the protest emergency talks were held on the water, with Jersey government representatives on one boat and representatives of the French fishing fleet on another, in order to comply with coronavirus restrictions.

Jersey’s chief minister John Le Fondre said: “The French fishermen protested peacefully and respectfully, and were able to set out their concerns directly to government representatives.

“We recognise that there have been challenges in the implementation of the new trade agreement.

“Speaking directly to the fishermen has enabled both parties to better understand how those challenges will be addressed, and we are proposing the establishment of a forum which will enable the Government of Jersey to continue to engage with all fishermen in the region openly and constructively.”

The French fishermen had been able to leave Jersey “knowing that they had been listened to, and that a step has been taken towards resolving the issues that have arisen during the move to the new trade agreement”.

A UK Government spokesman said: “We are pleased that French fishing boats have now left the vicinity of Jersey.

“Given the situation is resolved for now, the Royal Navy offshore patrol vessels will prepare to return to port in the UK.

HMS Tamar was one of the vessels sent to Jersey (MoD/PA)

“We remain on standby to provide any further assistance Jersey requests.”

The UK insisted that the Jersey authorities have a right to regulate fisheries in their waters under the Brexit trade agreement.

“We will work with Jersey to support the discussions under way with the European Commission,” the spokesman said.

The row erupted after the Jersey Government said French boats would be required to obtain licences to carry on fishing in the island’s waters under the terms of the trade deal with the EU, which came into force last Friday.

The move provoked a wave of anger among French fishing communities, which complained that boats which had operated there for years were suddenly having their access restricted, because they could not prove their historical links with the waters.

French fishing vessels outside the harbour at St Helier (Gary Grimshaw/Bailiwick Express/PA)

In Brussels, a spokeswoman for the European Commission said “additional conditions” attached to the new licences represented a breach of the trade deal.

She said they had “indicated to the UK that we see that the provisions of the EU/UK Trade and Co-operation Agreement, that we recently agreed, have not been met there, have not been respected”.

Jersey’s external relations minister, Ian Gorst, said the island’s authorities were “extremely grateful” to the UK Government for its prompt deployment of the patrol boats HMS Severn and HMS Tamar.

However he insisted that they wanted to find a diplomatic solution to de-escalate the situation.

“It’s important that we respond to threats, but the answer to this solution is to continue to talk and diplomacy,” he told BBC News.

Assistant minister for the environment, Gregory Guida, and Gregory Morel, Natural Environment Marine Resources, aboard the Jersey vessel (Government of Jersey/PA)

Earlier this week, French maritime minister Annick Girardin said Paris would cut off electricity to Jersey – which gets 95% of its power supply from France – if the dispute was not resolved.

The Jersey government has said that of the 41 French boats that applied for licences last Friday, 17 had been unable to provide the evidence needed to enable them to carry on as before.

Mr Gorst said: “It’s really important that we are able to work with those fishermen to help them provide the necessary evidence so that, if required, their licences can be amended.”

Nevertheless, there was concern on the island that the French action could escalate if the dispute was not resolved.

Fisherman Josh Dearing said the appearance of the French boats had been “like an invasion”, and welcomed the presence of the Royal Navy ships.

“The French can be hostile. All of our livelihoods are in that harbour and if they wanted to they could cause damage,” he told the PA news agency.

“They can blockade their own harbours – they wouldn’t think twice about coming and doing it to us.”

References

  1. ^ @BorisJohnson (twitter.com)
  2. ^ @lyndonfarnham (twitter.com)
  3. ^ @Ian_Gorst (twitter.com)
  4. ^ @GovJersey (twitter.com)
  5. ^ May 6, 2021 (twitter.com)

Lorry driver’s death could be linked to Liverpool ferry journey

A lorry driver who had to travel from Liverpool via ferry for work died after contracting legionnaire’s disease.

Kevin Budd, 53, was admitted to the Royal Stoke University Hospital on August 27, 2018, after holidaying in Skegness.

He complained about experiencing shortness of breath and died days later on September 2, 2018.

An inquest heard his cause of death was given as diffused alveolar damage, legionnaire’s disease, and leukaemia.

Stoke-on-Trent Live[1] report the dates and incubation period of the disease indicate he may have caught the disease during a work trip that took him through Liverpool.

His job also involved travelling to North Wales and Ireland.

Find out what’s happening in your local area by entering your postcode below:

Speaking in conclusion of the inquest in Stoke-on-Trent, the jury forewoman said: “Whilst on holiday Mr Budd became ill with a cold.

“Returning home his condition worsened. His condition got worse and he was admitted to hospital on August 27, 2018.

“He was placed into critical care. He was ventilated and placed into a coma and never regained consciousness.”

She added that the jury concluded that the legionella came “from an unspecified area”.

Doctor Nicol Coetzee, a consultant specialising in communicable diseases, was notified that Mr Budd had received a diagnosis of legionella on August 28, 2018, and began an investigation to find the source.

This consisted of tracing Mr Budd’s movements over the days where he was most likely to have picked up the disease, and cross checking it with data from places he visited to see if any cases were active in those places at the time of his visits.

These included trips to Ireland via ferry, setting out from Holyhead to Dublin, and returning via Liverpool.

No traces of legionella were found in any of the places that Mr Budd had visited over the last six months, or within a six mile radius of his home address in Stafford.

Sign up for a new-look Echo newsletter

It’s never been more important to stay in touch with the news, so subscribe now to the Liverpool Echo newsletter. Twice a day, seven days a week, we’ll deliver the biggest stories straight to your inbox.

We’ll also send special breaking news emails too for the latest stories that matter. You won’t miss a thing.

How do I sign up?

It’s free, easy and takes no time at all.

  1. First just click on this link to our newsletter sign-up centre[2].
  2. Once you’re there, put your email address where it says at the top, then click on the Echo Daily News button. There are other newsletters available too if you want them as well.
  3. When you’ve made your choice, press the Save Changes button.

But on September 7, 2018, five days after Mr Budd passed away, the ship Stena Adventurer, which is in the fleet that runs the route from Holyhead to Dublin, undertook a routine water sampling which found extremely high levels of legionella.

In one sample, they were over nine times the level designated as unacceptable.

The ship was given a “super-chlorination” in accordance with normal procedure, in which chlorinated water is flushed through the whole system to clear out any unwelcome microbes lurking in the water supply.

Lesley Cave, who works for the county council regulating water supplies, confirmed that she was requested to undertake the inspection as part of normal routine and that after the procedure it had once more reached a safe and acceptable level.

Ms. Cave was unable to say if Mr Budd travelled on the Stena Adventurer, and the cleaning process meant that it was impossible to confirm if the strain found on the ship was the same that Mr Budd contracted.

However, no other potential contacts were traced during Dr. Coetzee’s investigation, leaving open the possibility that Mr Budd may have contracted the disease during his ferry ride from Holyhead to Dublin.

Speaking in a statement to the inquest, pathologist Dr. Karthik Kalyanasundaram outlined legionella. He said: “Legionnaire’s disease is a severe pneumonia.

“Although this disease is an uncommon form of pneumonia data have shown that it is 2 to five times more common in men than in women.

“40-50% of cases are related to travel.”

Mr Budd was born in Wokingham on August 20 1965 and worked in the armed forces for 25 years as an electrician before entering civilian life as an HGV driver, a job which involved a great deal of travel.

References

  1. ^ Stoke-on-Trent Live (www.stokesentinel.co.uk)
  2. ^ just click on this link to our newsletter sign-up centre (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)

Amazon driver won’t face court over terrifying dashcam clip

An Amazon lorry driver who nearly forced a Burton van man off the road will face no court action, it has been revealed.

Van driver Adrian Kowalski said he was left shocked that the driver had escaped facing any charges and had only been asked to attend a driving course instead.

The 52-year-old van driver said he was left fearing for his life when the lorry tried to force his van off the road[1] during a shocking incident which was caught on dash-cam.

The heart-stopping near miss took place on November 18 last year after the 44-tonne truck followed Mr Kowalski down a road near the M1 in Marlborough, Derbyshire, Birmingham Live Birmingham Live reports.[2]

Footage shows the HGV swerving onto the wrong side of the road before veering towards Mr Kowalski’s vehicle causing him to take evasive action to avoid a horror crash.

The online retail giant confirmed at the time that the worker had been dismissed while Derbyshire Police launched an investigation.

Adrian Kowalski, the driver of the van, says he was left shaken by the incident (Image: Adrian Kowalski / SWNS)

But this week Mr Kowalski was left gobsmacked to learn the driver had been let off without any charges.

In a letter to him, the force even admitted there was enough evidence to justify a prosecution but court action would do nothing “to correct poor driving habits”.

He has now blasted the police’s “lenient” decision to punish the driver with a £180 Safe and Considerate Driving course.

He said: “You get a worse punishment for doing 36mph in a 30 zone than when you try and ram someone off the road in a 40-tonne vehicle.

“It wasn’t an accident. I remember road rage before used to be quite serious and now it just doesn’t seem to be.

“It just seems like he’s getting away; a half day course just seems very light and lenient.

“I received the letter last week and I thought it would be asking me to come to court. It was a bit of a shock, to be honest.

“I’ve got 14 days to reply if I think there are any mitigating circumstances so I’ve made a few notes and I’m currently deciding what to reply.

“I am definitely going to reply as that’s too lenient for someone who tried to do that.

“He tried to run me off the road and chase me down and was even on the wrong side of the road.

“Even a fine and points would be better than this.

“I think in America it even classes as attempted murder and they would have locked him up.

“I don’t know what the sentence options are but this seems to be so mild. Maybe the courts are backed up and that’s the reason behind it.

“This whole incident has made me wary and I never had a dash-cam till this happened.

“I’m a lot more cautious when I come to junctions and it’s not just about Amazon lorries either.

“I am going to email back as I don’t think it’s right but I want to see if I can find out what the possible sentences are before I go jumping in there.

“I would like to see what the options are but I am not happy.

“I’ve driven for 35 years and never seen anyone in a lorry driving like that – I was absolutely gobsmacked.”

The letter states the driver will be offered the educational course, which he will have to pay for, before completing a practical driver assessment to a satisfactory level.

He will only face prosecution if he refuses to attend the course or is involved in a similar incident within three years of its completion.

It states: “Whilst there is sufficient evidence in this case to justify a prosecution, there is no provision in law for a magistrate to offer such restraining and the imposition of a fine and penalty points will not do anything to correct poor driving habits.”

A Derbyshire Police spokesperson said: “Following an investigation into the incident the driver of the lorry was offered a safe and considerate driving course.

“Derbyshire Constabulary participates in the National Driver Offender Retraining Scheme – which seeks to improve the education of drivers who have committed driving offences.

“Courses are offered to drivers who have committed offences that, after a review, are deemed eligible based on a strict set of national criteria.

“Should the course not be undertaken by a certain date then the matter will be taken to court where a range of further sanctions can be imposed.”

Here are the top stories from the StaffordshireLive newsletter

Want to sign up to receive these stories straight to your inbox? It’s free and means you’ll never miss out on the most important Staffordshire news of the day

You can sign up for free here[3]

Not signed up yet but want to try it out?

You can read a preview of our newsletter here[4]

References

  1. ^ tried to force his van off the road (www.staffordshire-live.co.uk)
  2. ^ Birmingham Live reports. (www.birminghammail.co.uk)
  3. ^ here (www.staffordshire-live.co.uk)
  4. ^ here (e.staffordshire-live.co.uk)

France sends patrol boats as fishing tensions flare with UK – KXLY

“);
$spagination = flexSlider.find(“.spagination”);
SPagination.Init($spagination.get( 0 ), {
size: slide_obj.count, // pages size
page: 1, // selected page
step: 3, // pages before and after current
cb: function(p){
flexSlider.flexAnimate(p-1, true);
}
});
}
}
}

function gtx_gallery_slide_before(slide_obj){
var slide=slide_obj.animatingTo;
$active_slide=$all_slides.eq(slide) ;
slideshow_ad_loaded = false;

var current_html = $active_slide.children(“.gtx-ad-container”).html();
if (current_html) {$active_slide.children(“.gtx-ad-container”).html(current_html.trim())}

gtx_mixpanel_track_slide( slide_obj );

changeURL(parseInt($active_slide.attr(“data-attachment_id”)));

//THUMBS SYNC – PAGINATED THUMBNAIL NAVIGATION
if($thumbs!==”” && navigation == “paginated_thumbs”){
var right_item=$slider.find(“.slides li[data-i=”+(slide +1 )+”]”).attr(“data-i-only-pics”)
if( right_item!= “”){
$thumbs.find(“li.gtx-thumb-img”).removeClass(“flex-active-slide”);
$thumbs.find(“li.gtx-thumb-img[data-i=”+(slide +1 )+”]”).addClass(“flex-active-slide”);
$page=$thumbs.find(“.slides>li”).has(“li[data-i=”+(slide +1 )+”]”);
$thumbs.flexAnimate($page.index(), true);
}
}
}

function gtx_gallery_slide_after(slide_obj){
var slide=slide_obj.animatingTo;
$active_slide=$all_slides.eq(slide) ;

if($active_slide.hasClass(“gtx-ad-slide”)==1){
if ($active_slide.find(‘iframe’).length === 1) {
$active_slide.find(‘iframe’)[0].remove();
}
$slider.delay(100).queue(function(){
$(this).addClass(“gtx-gallery-loading”).dequeue();
});
$ad_container=$active_slide.children(“.gtx-ad-container”).first();

if ($($ad_container).html().length li[data-i=”+(slide +1 )+”]”).attr(“data-i-only-pics”)
if( right_item!= “”){
$thumbs.find(“li.gtx-thumb-img”).removeClass(“flex-active-slide”);
$thumbs.find(“li.gtx-thumb-img”).eq(right_item -1 ).addClass(“flex-active-slide”);
$thumbs.flexAnimate(right_item-1, true);
}
}

if(typeof(googletag) != “undefined” && googletag !== null && refresh_all_ads){
// Refresh ads within view

var tmp_now=new Date().getTime();
var last_refresh_diff= tmp_now – last_ad_refresh;
if(last_refresh_diff > 1000){
reset_ads_and_refresh();
last_ad_refresh=tmp_now;
}
}

//LAZY LOAD
range=5;
var $slides_to_hanle=$all_slides.slice(slide, slide + range +1);
if(slide – range >= 0){
$slides_to_hanle=$.merge($slides_to_hanle, $all_slides.slice(slide – range, slide ));
}else{
$slides_to_hanle=$.merge($slides_to_hanle, $all_slides.slice(0, range ));
$slides_to_hanle=$.merge($slides_to_hanle, $all_slides.slice(range * -1 ));
}
if(slide + range >= $all_slides.size()){
//handle first slides
$slides_to_hanle= $.merge($slides_to_hanle, $all_slides.slice(0,range));

}

$slides_to_hanle.find(“.gtx-image-container[data-background]”).each(function () {
var src = $(this).attr(“data-background”);
$(this).css(“background-image”, “url(“+src+”)”).removeAttr(“data-background”);
});

adjustNavHeight();
if( typeof SPagination !== “undefined” && flexSlider.find(“.spagination”).length>0 ){
if(SPagination.page != slide+1){
SPagination.page = slide + 1;
SPagination.Start();
}
}

}

function reset_ads_and_refresh(){
if(!advanced_ad_refresh){
// if option is not enabled, refresh all ads
googletag.pubads().refresh();
return;
}
if(!ads_to_refresh){
return;
}

var newAds = [];
for(var i = 0; i 0){
return false;
}
var slotWidth = $(‘#’+event.slot.getSlotElementId() + ‘ iframe’).width();
var slotHeight = $(‘#’+event.slot.getSlotElementId() + ‘ iframe’).height();

event.slot.tn_positionX = $(‘#’+event.slot.getSlotElementId()).offset().left;
event.slot.tn_positionY = $(‘#’+event.slot.getSlotElementId()).offset().top;
event.slot.tn_width = slotWidth;
event.slot.tn_height = slotHeight;

if(ads_to_refresh.indexOf(event.slot) wTop && slot.tn_positionY 8){
gtx_gallery_thumbs_set_backwards()
}
}

function gtx_gallery_thumbs_after(slide_obj){
if(slide_obj.count > 8){
gtx_gallery_thumbs_set_backwards()
}
}

function gtx_gallery_paginated_thumbs_start(slide_obj){
gtx_gallery_paginated_thumbs_lazy();
if(false && slide_obj.count > 8){
$thumbs.find(“.flex-control-nav.flex-control-paging”).removeClass(“flex-control-paging”).addClass(“g-pagination”);
}
if(slide_obj.count > 8){
$thumbs.find(“.flex-control-nav.flex-control-paging”).hide().after(“”);
$pagination = $thumbs.find(“.spagination”);
SPagination.Init($pagination.get( 0 ), {
size: slide_obj.count, // pages size
page: 1, // selected page
step: 3, // pages before and after current
cb: function(p){
$thumbs.flexAnimate(p-1, true);
}
});
}
}

function gtx_gallery_paginated_thumbs_before(slide_obj){
var slide=(typeof slide_obj == “object” && slide_obj.animatingTo ? slide_obj.animatingTo : 0);
gtx_gallery_paginated_thumbs_lazy(slide_obj);

}

function gtx_gallery_paginated_thumbs_after(slide_obj){
var slide=(typeof slide_obj == “object” && slide_obj.animatingTo ? slide_obj.animatingTo : 0);
//THUMBS SYNC – Go to first slide of this batch
if($thumbs!==”” && navigation == “paginated_thumbs”){

var $active_slide=$slider.find(“.slides>li.flex-active-slide”);
var $active_thumb_page=$thumbs.find(“.slides>li.flex-active-slide”);
//Check if the current slide is within this thumb batch
if(!$active_thumb_page.find(“li[data-i=”+$active_slide.attr(“data-i”)+”]”).size()){
first_thumb=$active_thumb_page.find(“li”).first().attr(“data-i”);
flexSlider.flexAnimate(first_thumb – 1, true);
}

}

if( typeof SPagination !== “undefined” && $thumbs.find(“.spagination”).length>0 ){
if(SPagination.page != slide+1){
SPagination.page = slide + 1;
SPagination.Start();
}
}

}

function gtx_gallery_paginated_thumbs_lazy(slide_obj){
var slide=(typeof slide_obj == “object” && slide_obj.animatingTo ? slide_obj.animatingTo : 0);
//LAZY LOAD THUMBS
if($all_thumbs!==”” && navigation == “paginated_thumbs”){
range=1;
var $slides_to_hanle=$all_thumbs.slice(slide, slide + range + 1);
if(slide – range >= 0){
$slides_to_hanle=$.merge($slides_to_hanle, $all_thumbs.slice(slide – range, slide ));
}else{
$slides_to_hanle=$.merge($slides_to_hanle, $all_thumbs.slice(0, range ));
$slides_to_hanle=$.merge($slides_to_hanle, $all_thumbs.slice(range * -1 ));
}
if(slide + range >= $all_thumbs.size()){
//handle first slides
$slides_to_hanle= $.merge($slides_to_hanle, $all_thumbs.slice(0,range));

}
$slides_to_hanle.each(function () {
$(this).find(“img[lazy-src]”).each(function () {
var src = $(this).attr(“lazy-src”);
if(!src) return;
$(this).attr(“src”,src).removeAttr(“lazy-src”);
$thumbs.find(“img[lazy-src=””+src+””]”).attr(“src”,src).removeAttr(“lazy-src”);
});
});
}

}

function adjustNavHeight(){
imageHeight = flexSlider.find(“.gtx-slide-img.flex-active-slide .gtx-image-container”).outerHeight();
if(imageHeight > 0){
flexSlider.find(“.flex-prev,.flex-next”).css(“top”,Math.round(imageHeight/2));
}
}

var nextSlotId = 1;
function generateNextSlotName() {
var id = nextSlotId++;
return “adslot_” + id+”_”+Math.floor( Date.now() / 1000 );
}

function addAdInto(selector,options) {
try{
gtx_gallery_enable_dfp();
}catch(err) {
}

var slide=options.slide || -1;
var slotName = generateNextSlotName();
var ad_index = 0;

// Create a div for the slot
var slotDiv = document.createElement(‘div’);
slotDiv.id = slotName; // Id must be the same as slotName
$( selector ).append( slotDiv );
try{
ad_index=$( selector ).closest(“.gtx-ad-slide”).attr(“data-i-only-ads”);
}catch(err) {

}

// Define the slot itself, call display() to
// register the div and refresh() to fetch ad.
googletag.cmd.push(function() {
slideshow_ad_loaded = true;
adslots[slotName] = googletag.defineSlot(‘/21745780820/kxly/news/politics/national-politics/french-fishermen-gather-boats-in-post-brexit-license-protest’, [300, 250], slotName)
.addService(googletag.pubads())
.setTargeting(“placement”, “gallery”)
.setTargeting(“slide”, slide)
.setTargeting(“post”, ‘1947344’)
.setTargeting(“category”, ‘[“national-politics”,”world-news”]’)
.setTargeting(“galleryAdIndex”, ad_index);

googletag.display(slotName);
googletag.sizeMapping().addSize( [0,0], [[300,250]])
// force refresh if lazy loading
if(gtx_ad_man.lazy_loading_ads) {
googletag.pubads().refresh([adslots[slotName]]);
}

});
}

gtx_gallery_syncHash = function(path){
pic = “”;
re = /pic/?([0-9]+)/?$/i;

if(!path && window.location.hash && window.location.hash.match(re)) path = window.location.hash;
if(!path && window.location.pathname && window.location.pathname.match(re)) path = window.location.pathname;
if(path){
matchslide = path.match(re);
if(matchslide && matchslide[1]>0){
pic = parseInt(matchslide[1]);
}
if(!isNaN(pic) && pic > 0){
slide=get_slide_by_attachment_id(pic);
if(slide>0){
avoid_next_pageview = true;
flexSlider.flexAnimate(slide – 1, true);
}
}
}else{
gtx_mixpanel_track_slide( )
}
}

function debounce(func, wait, immediate) {
var timeout;
return function() {
var context = this, args = arguments;
var later = function() {
timeout = null;
if (!immediate) func.apply(context, args);
};
var callNow = immediate && !timeout;
clearTimeout(timeout);
timeout = setTimeout(later, wait);
if (callNow) func.apply(context, args);
};
};

// delay the url state replacement to avoid overload
// RAYOS-271
var efficientlyReplaceState = debounce(function(title, path){
window.history.replaceState({}, title, path);
}, 1250)

function changeURL(pic){
basepath = window.location.pathname.replace(//pic/?([0-9]+)/?$/i,”/”);
if(isNaN(pic)) return;

path = basepath + “pic/”+pic+”/”;

title = “Pic “+pic;
if (typeof(window.history.replaceState) == “function”) {
efficientlyReplaceState(title, path)
} else {
window.location.hash = path;
}
}

function get_slide_by_attachment_id(id){
var slide=$slider.find(“.slides li[data-attachment_id=”+id+”]”).attr(“data-i”);
return parseInt(slide, 10);
}

function gtx_mixpanel_track_slide( slide_obj ){
if(slide_obj){
var slide = slide_obj.animatingTo;
}else{
var slide = 0;
}
$active_slide=$all_slides.eq(slide) ;

if(!avoid_next_pageview){
try{
var loc=location.pathname+”#slide”+(parseInt(slide)+1);
ga(“send”, “pageview”, loc);
if(ga.getByName(“gtxcelTracker”)){
ga(“gtxcelTracker.send”, “pageview”, loc);
}
}catch(err){

}
}
avoid_next_pageview = false;
//Mixpanel track image viewed
try{
if(typeof mixpanel !== “undefined”){
var slide_type=$active_slide.attr(“data-slide-type”) || “”;
if(slide_type==”pic”) slide_type=”image”; // rename “pic” to “image”
mixpanel_args = {
title: “”,
“post id”: ‘1947344’,
“slide type”: slide_type,
“gallery template”: “Slideshow Thumbnails”,
}
mixpanel_args.categories = “National Politics, World News”;
mixpanel_args.author = “Rayos Syndication User”;

mixpanel_args[ “post type” ] = “page”;

if(slide_type == “ad”){
mixpanel_args[ “ad index” ]=$active_slide.attr(“data-i-only-ads”) || “”;
}else{
mixpanel_args[ “slide number” ]= $active_slide.attr(“data-i-only-pics”) || “”;
mixpanel_args[ “image title” ]= $active_slide.attr(“data-title”) || “”;
mixpanel_args.caption= $active_slide.attr(“data-caption”) || “”;
mixpanel_args.url= $active_slide.attr(“data-pic”) || “”;
}
var img_src = $active_slide.attr(‘src’);
if(!img_src){
img_src = $active_slide.attr(‘data-pic’);
}
var pattern = /uploads/(.*)/;
var match = pattern.exec(img_src);
var img_path = match ? img_path = match[1] : “”;
mixpanel_args[ “image path” ]= img_path;

mixpanel.track(“image viewed”, mixpanel_args);
}
}catch(err){
console.error(“error”, err);
}

}

//Add a callback on ad render
googletag.cmd.push(function() {
googletag.pubads().addEventListener(‘slotRenderEnded’, function(event) {
var slotName=event.slot.getSlotElementId();
if(typeof adslots[slotName] !==”undefined” && !event.isEmpty){
$slider.clearQueue();
$slider.removeClass(“gtx-gallery-loading”);
}
});
});

jQuery(“#gtx-gallery-thumbs-1947344”).flexslider({
animation: “slide”,
controlNav: false,
animationLoop: false,
slideshow: false,
itemWidth: 100,
itemMargin: 5,
move: 1,
//asNavFor: “#gtx-gallery-slider-1947344”,
prevText: “”,
nextText: “”,
after: gtx_gallery_thumbs_after,
after: gtx_gallery_thumbs_before
});
$thumbs=$(“#gtx-gallery-thumbs-1947344”).data(“flexslider”);
$thumbs.find(“li.gtx-thumb-img”).first( ).addClass(“flex-active-slide”);

$(“#gtx-gallery-slider-1947344”).flexslider({
animation: “slide”,
pauseOnHover: true,
controlNav: false,
//animationLoop: false,
//slideshow: false,
//sync: “#gtx-gallery-thumbs-1947344”,
prevText: “”,
nextText: “”,
slideshow: false,
init: gtx_gallery_slide_init,
start: gtx_gallery_slide_start,
before: gtx_gallery_slide_before,
after: gtx_gallery_slide_after
});

if(mobile_mode){
$slider.find(“.flex-direction-nav”).hide();
}

});

//]]>

LONDON (AP) — Vessels from Britain’s Royal Navy and French police boats patrolled Thursday near the English Channel island of Jersey, where French fishermen angry about losing access to waters off their coast gathered for a maritime protest.

The irate mariners set off flares and entered the island’s main harbor, in the first major dispute between France and Britain over fishing rights in the wake of Brexit.

The European Union appealed for calm, but also accused the U.K. of not respecting the terms of the post-Brexit trade deal agreed to by the two sides.

The naval policing boats Athos and Themis were sent to keep watch on waters between France and Jersey, French maritime authorities for the English Channel and North Sea said. The deployment came after Britain on Wednesday directed two naval vessels, HMS Severn and HMS Tamar, to also patrol the waters around the island, a self-governing British Crown Dependency near the coast of northern France.

French fishermen steamed into Jersey waters to demonstrate against new post-Brexit rules requiring them to submit their past fishing activities in order to receive a license to continue operating in the island’s waters. French fishing communities say some boats that have operated around Jersey for years have suddenly had their access restricted.

Dimitri Rogoff, who heads a grouping of fishermen, said about 50 boats from French ports along the western Normandy coast joined the protest Thursday morning, gathering their fleet off the Jersey port of St. Helier.

He said the protest over licenses for French fishermen was not an attempt to blockade the port.

“This isn’t an act of war,” Rogoff said in a phone interview. “It’s an act of protest.”

Jersey fisherman John Dearing said the scene off St. Helier was “like an invasion.”

“It was quite a sight,” he told British news agency PA. “It was impressive, I looked from the shore this morning and it was just like a sea of red lights and flares already going off at sea.”

French authorities said the patrol vessels were there to assist in any maritime emergencies.

“We would thus be capable of intervening rapidly should the situation worsen, which is not the case at the moment,” they said in an emailed statement to The Associated Press.

The British government said its two navy vessels “would remain in place to monitor the situation as a precautionary measure.”

Opponents accused Prime Minister Boris Johnson of escalating the crisis, and of using the fishing spat as an Election Day stunt. The story dominated newspaper front page on Thursday, as voters go to the polls in local and regional elections in England, Scotland and Wales.

There have been numerous bouts of friction in the past between French and British fishermen. The latest dispute, the first since Britain’s departure from the European Union last year, came after the island implemented new requirements that make fishermen account for their past work in Jersey waters to be eligible for a license to continue operating there.

Authorities on Jersey, the largest of the Channel Islands, said some of the French boats had not provided the right paperwork, and accused France of acting disproportionately after Paris threatened to cut off electricity to the island.

Jersey and the other Channel Islands lie closer to France than to Britain, and Jersey receives most of its electricity from France, supplied through undersea cables.

French maritime minister Annick Girardin warned Tuesday that France was ready to take “retaliatory measures,” accusing Jersey of stalling in issuing licenses to French boats under the terms of the U.K.’s post-Brexit trade deal with the EU.

Jersey government officials met with French fishermen on Thursday in an attempt to end the dispute.

Don Thompson, president of the Jersey Fishermen’s Association, said the French fishermen should be given more time to supply the information they need to get the permits but that no more concessions should be made.

“The real way to solve this is not by rolling over and giving French what they want,” he told the AP. “They want the conditions completely removed from the licenses.”

He said that if French fishermen had missing paperwork, “then they just need to go back to their government, not hold Jersey under siege.”

How the Irish Republic is making the best of Brexit

THE NEW trade frontier between Northern Ireland and the British mainland was intended as a conflict-prevention measure, allowing Great Britain to leave the European Union’s single market without reimposing a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic to the south. So far, not so good.

Unionist politicians, angered by disruption to shopping and trade with Great Britain, now call for the protocol that imposed a new Britain-Northern Ireland border to be scrapped. In Protestant areas of County Antrim youths rioted last month, egged on by loyalist paramilitaries. Last week Northern Ireland’s first minister, Arlene Foster, was forced to resign by her party, having reluctantly accepted the protocol as the least bad solution.

There has been much less fuss in the south, even though, in terms of trade with Britain, both parts of Ireland are in much the same post-Brexit boat. The Republic of Ireland has been independent from London since 1922, but Britain is still by far the biggest source of Irish imports of goods, at €17.8bn ($21.4bn) last year, and its fourth-largest customer for goods exports: €12.4bn in 2020. Consumers in both countries share many tastes, and until January 1st co-membership of the EU allowed British high-street retailers like Boots and JD Sports to treat the republic as a sub-region of their UK supply chains.

In Dublin, as in Belfast, grocery shelves in British-owned retailers grew notably barer after Brexit kicked in on New Year’s Day, although supplies have since recovered as businesses find ways to navigate the new system.

The mood is calmer in the south, partly because it saw the problem coming. Arnold Dillon of Retail Ireland, a trade group, says that the Irish government began planning for a worst-case hard Brexit right after the referendum in 2016. Northern Ireland was less well-prepared, not least because it had to wait until Christmas Eve to see the outlines of a last-minute trade deal. Boris Johnson, Britain’s prime minister, made planning almost impossible by issuing contradictory statements, asserting that there would be no new customs border on the island of Ireland, no new regulatory checks between Britain and Northern Ireland, and yet also regulatory divergence between the UK and Europe. “Our experience is that the UK has been woefully, awfully, badly, naively underprepared for Brexit,” says Simon McKeever, the boss of the Irish Exporters Association.

Another difference in the south is that businesses and politicians expect to see benefits from Brexit, as well as losses. Kieran Donoghue, head of financial services at Ireland’s industrial-development authority, a state booster for investment, said that Ireland has already secured around 100 new investments and 6,000 jobs, half of them in finance, as UK-based businesses shift their headquarters out of London so as to retain an EU domicile and access to the European single market.

While red tape and delays have roughly halved lorry traffic on Ireland’s traditional “land bridge” across Britain to the rest of the EU, the number of direct ferry sailings from the Republic to the continent has gone up from around 12 a week to more than 40. Irish trade groups hope that Irish chains will now source more products locally, and replace UK supply hubs with local depots, creating new jobs.

Yet, as with Brexit itself, this isn’t all about money or trade. For a century since it won independence, the Republic of Ireland has tried to escape the shadow of its former colonial power and to reach out to the world. By contrast, Northern Ireland’s unionists and many pragmatic businesses have no interest in distancing themselves further from the rest of the UK.

“Even though most Irish people think that Brexit is crazy, the government here is realistic that you have to deal with what you get,” says Bobby McDonagh, a former Irish ambassador to London and senior diplomat in Brussels. “We still need to co-operate with London on Northern Ireland, and in other ways.”

For more coverage of matters relating to Brexit, visit our Brexit hub[1]

This article appeared in the Europe section of the print edition under the headline “Pluses and minuses”

References

  1. ^ Brexit hub (www.economist.com)
Exit mobile version