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Auckland Transport proposing massive road safety investment for NZ’s largest city

Auckland Transport proposing massive road safety investment for NZ’s largest city

Auckland Transport (AT) is proposing to invest NZ£700m (US£484m) in road safety initiatives to reduce death and serious injury on roads in New Zealand’s largest and most populous urban area. Latest figures show that in the past three years (2014-2017) road deaths and serious injuries in Auckland have increased at more than five times the rate of travel, and more than three times the rate of the rest of New Zealand.

On average, there is at least one death or serious injury on Auckland’s roads every day. The funding was signaled in the draft Regional Land Transport Plan, which was open for public consultation until May 14, and feedback will now be analyzed before the final budgets are approved. AT is proposing an ambitious safety infrastructure acceleration program that is estimated to reduce deaths and serious injuries by up to 150 (15-20%) over three years.

This includes reducing speed limits and installing traffic calming treatments on at least 10% of the city’s road network, better and safer pedestrian infrastructure, such as crossings and islands, safety cameras, and high friction road surfacing that reduces the risk of skidding. In addition, AT will increase the number of high-risk intersections that will receive safety improvements. The refreshed approach has been informed by an independent review of road safety issues and responses, commissioned by the AT Board in 2017.

Auckland Transport proposing massive road safety investment for NZ’s largest city Auckland City Council and AT attended the Associate Minister’s National Road Safety Summit in April, which brought together local government representatives from all over the country to discuss the road safety challenge facing New Zealand. AT’s own actions include an internal training program on road safety challenges and interventions to the agency’s entire organization, including the AT Board and executive leadership team.

In line with central government’s update of its ‘Safer Journeys’ road safety strategy, AT is also working to update the organization’s road safety strategy to be in line with Vision Zero principals. “In the past three years, deaths and serious injuries on Auckland roads have increased by more than 70% – that’s appalling and unacceptable,” noted Auckland’s Mayor, Phil Goff. “Compared with other international cities, we have one of the highest rates of pedestrian, cyclist and motorcyclist fatality rates. That demands action and we will be investing heavily in road safety measures with the regional fuel tax over the next 10 years, directly and indirectly contributing over half a billion dollars more into road safety.”

NZ Associate Minister of Transport, Julie Anne Genter said, “It’s unacceptable that so many Aucklanders are killed or seriously injured simply moving around the city.

It is 100% possible to make our streets safer, so I’m really pleased to see Auckland Transport prioritizing this work.”

May 18, 2018

Maersk to Cut Services as It Battles Shipping Glut

Maersk containers stacked at the Saint-Nazaire harbor in Montoir-de-Bretagne, France. The company said it would cut back on capacity after it reported a weak first quarter. Maersk containers stacked at the Saint-Nazaire harbor in Montoir-de-Bretagne, France.

The company said it would cut back on capacity after it reported a weak first quarter. Photo: loic venance/Agence France-Presse/Getty Images By Costas Paris and

Ian Walker

Updated May 17, 2018 12:53 p.m. ET 0 COMMENTS [6]

A.P. Moller-Maersk[7] AMKBY -9.74% [8] A/S said it would cut back on capacity to combat falling freight rates and rising fuel costs, after the Danish shipping giant reported a weak first quarter that sent its shares down about 8%.

The world’s biggest container operator said its underlying loss widened to £239 million from a loss of £139 million a year earlier, with Chief Executive Soren Skou blaming rampant overcapacity as the main culprit and warning that a trade war between the U.S. and China would dash any hopes of a recovery in the shipping industry after a long down cycle.

“In the short term we will be closing down some services,” Mr.

Skou said in an interview. “Overcapacity is the biggest defect.”

Maersk shares were down 7.9% to 9,350 Danish kroner (about £1,480) on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange. Maersk reported a net profit of £2.75 billion, compared with a profit of £245 million in the same period last year, but the gain came from the sale of two units, Maersk Oil and Maersk Tankers. Mr.

Skou said higher fuel prices had added £70 to the cost of shipping a container from Asia to Europe and across the Pacific. Maersk currently moves more than 4 million containers, or 19% of global capacity.

Freight rates between Asia and Europe hover around £780 per box, about half the £1,500 break-even level. Maersk reiterated previous guidance that it expects 2018 underlying profit to be above the 2017 figure of £356 million, but Mr.

Skou said that depends on growing geopolitical risks.

“A trade war between the U.S. and China would be very, very bad,” he said, adding that new U.S. sanctions on Iran are “a driver” for rising oil prices.

Costs are rising overall and becoming inflationary. That’s not what we are used to.

–Maersk CEO Soren Skou

“Costs are rising overall and becoming inflationary. That’s not what we are used to,” Mr.

Skou said. He said Maersk leases or charters around 400 ships from a total of 750 in operation and that a number of them would be returned to their owners.

Maersk bought German competitor Hamburg Sud for £4 billion last year, which expanded its network by around 30%, while cargo volumes have grown by 24%. Mr.

Skou said Maersk would stop moving cargo to and from Iran, fearing repercussions from Washington.

“No shipping line that operates globally will be able to do business in Iran if the sanctions come to full force the way they intend to,” he said.

Container ships move the vast majority of manufactured goods and Maersk’s performance is seen as a barometer of the health of global trade.

Write to Costas Paris at [email protected] and Ian Walker at [email protected][9][10]

References

  1. ^ Biography (www.wsj.com)
  2. ^ @CostasParis (twitter.com)
  3. ^ [email protected] (www.wsj.com)
  4. ^ Biography (www.wsj.com)
  5. ^ [email protected] (www.wsj.com)
  6. ^ 0 COMMENTS (www.wsj.com)
  7. ^ A.P.

    Moller-Maersk (quotes.wsj.com)

  8. ^ AMKBY -9.74% (quotes.wsj.com)
  9. ^ [email protected] (www.wsj.com)
  10. ^ [email protected] (www.wsj.com)

EU Publishes New Regulations for Cars and Commercial Road Haulage Vehicles to Cut Death Toll

Sweeping Changes to Vehicle Emissions, Safety Equipment, Infrastructure and Autonomous Technology EUROPE – Safety on the road must always be of paramount importance, both for the private motorist and the road haulage operator, and today the European Commission has launched a programme[1] to address the 25,000 deaths that occur on EU roads annually. The avowed intent is to halve these casualties by 2030, whilst also cutting the number of serious injuries in road accidents. Measures include the first ever CO2 standards for heavy-duty vehicles, a strategic Action Plan for the development and manufacturing of batteries in Europe and a forward-looking strategy on connected and automated mobility.

The analysis of a reduction to the magnitude of casualties envisaged was arrived at after a study by TRL[2], the UK transport research laboratory and has resulted in a lengthy paper published by the EU (viewable here[3]) which has a complete picture of the cost effectiveness of the measures to be taken.

In short the EU has the exclusive authority to set minimum safety standards for all new vehicles sold on the EU market (UK readers let’s not mention the B word at this stage). The standards were last revised in 2009 and meanwhile there has been a hotchpotch of measures[4] taken by individual urban authorities to restrict a variety of vehicles and raise revenue by doing so. The incoming EU revisions affecting cars, vans, lorries and buses will include mandatory installation of new driver assistance technologies, as well as revised minimum crash testing standards and measures to protect pedestrians and cyclists.

These measures are expected to come into force from 2021 onwards. Fully autonomous vehicles are of course currently being tested across the continent and these will require new measures to ensure they are carefully regulated. Some of the technology is transferable to driver controlled cars, for example overridable Intelligent Speed Assistance (ISA) and Automated Emergency Braking (AEB).

ISA is already offered as standard on many cars and the system usually uses a sign-recognition video camera and a GPS-linked speed limit database to help drivers keep to the current speed limit, thus saving both lives, fuel and speeding penalties. The European Transport Safety Council (ETSC[5]) has issued a report[6] on prioritising the safety of autonomous vehicles and Antonio Avenoso, Executive Director of ETSC, commented on the European Commission’s proposals, saying: “Taken together, today’s announcements could represent the biggest step forward in road safety in Europe since the introduction of the seat belt.

Road traffic injury is still the number one killer of young people across the continent so these essential measures cannot come soon enough. Today’s announcements alone will not make the difference; it is absolutely crucial that EU Member States and the European Parliament give their backing to the plans and that they do not give in to pressure from car manufacturers, who are already attempting to weaken parts of the vehicle safety proposal.” The new proposals are part of ‘EU Mobility Package III[7]‘ and included in the measures are revisions to safety requirements which would see current road and tunnel infrastructure safety management directives extended to include more than the EU TEN-T network.

Again the ETSC has published its own position paper[8] calling for all motorways, all EU-funded roads and main roads in the EU should be covered by the new directives in the future.

The European Commission estimates that this phase of its proposed measures alone could prevent more than 3000 deaths by 2030.

EU Publishes New Regulations for Cars and Commercial Road Haulage Vehicles to Cut Death TollEU Publishes New Regulations for Cars and Commercial Road Haulage Vehicles to Cut Death Toll

References

  1. ^ launched a programme (tinyurl.com)
  2. ^ TRL (trl.co.uk)
  3. ^ viewable here (publications.europa.eu)
  4. ^ hotchpotch of measures (www.handyshippingguide.com)
  5. ^ ETSC (etsc.eu)
  6. ^ issued a report (etsc.eu)
  7. ^ EU Mobility Package III (ec.europa.eu)
  8. ^ position paper (etsc.eu)

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