Driving To Deliver Your Business

Management

Madrid: fastest-growing cargo airport

A report from LogIndex, the data company that is part of freight forwarder Kuehne + Nagel Group, has ranked the world’s airports according to their airfreight growth rates on a moving 12-month basis (see below for table). LogIndex managing director and K+N Management global head of new business Joao Monteiro summed up: “All of the airports in our sample show rising annual rates, even though the uptrend has slowed substantially in 2018. Looking ahead, there are reasons to be cautious amid rising uncertainty and threats from protectionist measures and rhetoric.”

On average, the 21 airports included in the report demonstrate a growth rate of around 6%. Madrid Barajas International Airport came top, with a growth rate of 15.5%. This was driven by significant international inbound and outbound tonnages, LogIndex said, and is in line with the general trend across Spanish airport operator Aena’s gateways in the first five months of 2018 (up 14% year on year).

Mexico City, up 12.1%, ranked second as international volumes moving through the gateway rose significantly; Shanghai Pudong placed third with a 10% increase in traffic. Of course, an airport with a relatively low cargo throughput can achieve significant growth with even a small increase in volume – and vice versa. As such, it is perhaps unsurprising that major freight gateways like Frankfurt and Paris are demonstrating a fairly flat trend in their cargo growth rates.

Similarly, Hong Kong, the world’s largest cargo hub by volume, placed 12th in the table although its growth of 5.4% would translate into a substantial tonnage figure. The high ranking of airports in New York, Chicago, Zurich, and London (Heathrow) is “noticeable”, LogIndex said – particularly the latter, in light of the current uncertainty surrounding Brexit and the resulting “rather sluggish developments” in Britain. The company noted that the pace of global airfreight growth has slowed in the last six months, a development that has coincided with a reduction in export orders in the manufacturing sector.

Read more cargo airport news[1]

References

  1. ^ Opens external link in new window (www.aircargonews.net)

Teething Trouble with New Port Terminal IT System Cause Road Haulage and Container Collection Delays

Some Customers Subject to Problems as Management Software Beds In UK – Delays at Britain’s busiest port, Felixstowe[1], are not uncommon when the weather is bad, the exposed location on the east coast facing out to the North Sea is, unsurprisingly, often subject to the worst of the country’s storms, as when the recent ‘Beast from the East’ struck in early March, an occurrence that even saw the more sheltered Thames side location for London Gateway suspend operations. Now however it is gremlins in a new terminal operating system which are causing delays for hauliers looking to collect empty export freight containers and others.

As was the case in September 2016 when the port simply ran out of capacity and had to issue an apologetic statement[2] to its customers, so again Hutchison Ports have had to explain what is occurring having installed its new in house designed nGen port operating system[3] at the weekend. The company says:

“We are aware that some customers may be experiencing delays at the Port of Felixstowe as we bed-in our new terminal operating system: nGen. The new system is operating across our container and rail terminals after a successful migration of data on Sunday 10 June. The implementation of any major system is a complex process. nGen is already in use at 25 Hutchison Ports around the world and will provide a stable, reliable and consistent level of performance for our customers for many years to come.

“We have a highly trained and experienced team, including specialists from Hutchison Ports Hong Kong, who have installed nGen at many ports around the world overseeing the implementation. We are currently experiencing system communication inconsistencies within the container yard which are having a knock on effect on yard performance. All our container yards remain open, processing over 3,800 trucks yesterday.

The team are working to resolve the issues and we expect normal operations to be resumed as soon as possible. We thank you for your cooperation and understanding during this time.” It has been reported locally that the inadequacies of the new system have resulted in some severe delays and cancellations across all areas of port operations, including rail, road and shipside container moves.

Speaking to the Handy Shipping Guide, Paul Davey, Head of Corporate Affairs at Hutchison Ports (UK) said: “While we are still handling the same number of containers as usual we are working hard and getting over the initial teething problems. Delays are the exception not the norm and we apologise to anyone affected.

Felixstowe is open for business and the staff are getting used to the new system.” Having spoken to some of those delayed in Felixstowe it seems the major problem is actually the collection of empty containers, in many ways the worst scenario as drivers are scheduled to leave the port for export collections, many of which are for booked times. One operator with interests in Felixstowe tells us that drivers applying for boxes are being refused as the paperwork doesn’t tie up.

Such a problem necessitates a visit to the Customer Services desk where queues can be between 20 and 70 drivers deep. This can mean 3-4 hour delays with no refreshments or apparently facilities of any sort and tempers are occasionally fraying at the extreme delays. Photo: One from the archive.

The Zhen Hua 23 which successfully delivered two new remote control ship-to-shore gantry cranes from China recently, shown beached after her previous similar mission almost a decade earlier to the day when the ship dragged her moorings in the eastern gales that year, causing her to crash into the quay bringing down two older cranes at the port’s Landguard Terminal.

Teething Trouble with New Port Terminal IT System Cause Road Haulage and Container Collection DelaysTeething Trouble with New Port Terminal IT System Cause Road Haulage and Container Collection Delays

References

  1. ^ Felixstowe (www.portoffelixstowe.co.uk)
  2. ^ apologetic statement (files.constantcontact.com)
  3. ^ nGen port operating system (hutchisonports.com)

Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off

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NEW YORK (AP) – Starting a food truck to sell tacos or barbecue on downtown streets may seem easy or fun, but owners are finding they need more sophisticated plans now that the novelty has worn off. A culinary fad a decade ago, food trucks have lost some luster and even new ones may not draw a crowd. Many prospective restaurateurs now use trucks as low-cost test kitchens and as literal marketing vehicles.

And food truck operators soon realize they need to think strategically – especially about the winter. Jack and Max Barber started a food truck called Mainely Burgers in 2012, selling burgers and fries at the beach in Scarborough, Maine, and the next year added a second truck in Portland and an ice cream truck. But the competition with Portland’s restaurants was tough.

In this Friday, June 8, 2018, photo customers get their lunch at the Japanese food truck Okamoto Kitchen in Beverly Hills, Calif. Rather than sushi and tempura, they serve meat, fish and sandwiches using traditional Japanese flavors like ponzu. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

“We were definitely bummed out that doing the streets of Portland wasn’t working,” Jack Barber says. The brothers realized they had to change their business model. While the trucks are still a big part of the business, catering is a better way to bring in revenue.

The Barbers now have a full catering calendar, and business has been good enough that they have a restaurant in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Food trucks are still appealing to chefs and entrepreneurs because they cost less than restaurants to open – tens of thousands of dollars versus hundreds of thousands or more, says John Gordon, a restaurant consultant with Pacific Management Consulting Group. That difference was particularly attractive during the Great Recession, and the cheap menus drew consumers who could get unique food for less than at a restaurant.

But trucks feel less special to customers now, particularly in big cities, restaurant consultant Clark Wolf says. “They’re no longer a kind of secret, movable, underground treasure,” he says. The biggest growth in the industry is past, according to market research firm IBISWorld.

It counted 4,046 food trucks in the U.S. last year, nearly twice the number of 2008. But it projects annual revenue growth of 3 percent from 2017 to 2022, compared to 7.3 percent from 2012 to last year, when revenue totaled nearly £1 billion. When Gerald and Chizuru Abraham started their Japanese food truck in Los Angeles three years ago, they were undaunted by the fact that “the glory days are over,” Gerald Abraham says.

“The heyday when trucks could pull up just about anywhere and build a line in minutes is nothing short of a fantasy to us,” he says. But Okamoto Kitchen has been successful, and added a second truck a year ago, because the couple has chosen their menu carefully. Rather than sushi and tempura, they serve meat, fish and sandwiches using traditional Japanese flavors like ponzu.

“To survive, you have to have some sort of unique concept,” Abraham says. The couple also doesn’t bring the truck to the same locations too often so customers won’t tire of their cuisine. But selling vegan pizza daily at the same spot, outside Buzz Mill, an Austin, Texas, bar and coffee house, works for Robbie Lordi.

“We feed their regular customers, so they don’t have to leave to eat elsewhere,” says Lordi, who started his truck, Li’l Nonna’s, two years ago. It’s common for Austin bars without their own food operations to arrange with trucks to park nearby. Lordi also has a regular clientele, and business is growing enough that he’s considering adding a truck or opening a restaurant.

Finding a regular place has made Bruce Smith’s fried chicken truck, Chick-N-Nooga, a success – a turnaround from his first food truck, which succumbed to slow winter sales in 2013. Now Smith sells to employees of Amazon’s warehouse in Chattanooga, Tennessee, several days a week. That meant a 50 percent increase in revenue last month compared to May 2017.

“Amazon is the reason I survived,” Smith says. He’s now considering whether to expand, and like Lordi, deciding whether to do so with another truck or a restaurant. The owners’ struggles are proof that food trucks require a strategy, says Matt Geller, president of the industry group National Food Truck Association.

“If your dream is to own one food truck and make money, don’t do it,” he advises. Drew Pumphrey also needed a new plan. The first three years for his barbecue truck, The Smoking Swine, were tough; winters in Baltimore are lean times.

But two years ago, Smith’s truck was featured on the Food Network show, “Diners, Drive-ins and Dives,” and Pumphrey began getting catering orders from companies and organizations. “Most of that activity comes through the months when we’re not on the road that much, from November to March,” he says. Being in the right place at the right time helps.

Greg Tillery knew a food truck in New Orleans could lead to a bigger business, but “five years later I never would have guessed in my wildest dreams I would have a restaurant on Canal Street.” Two years later, the truck, We Dat’s, had a line of 60 people waiting for chicken and shrimp at the Bayou Classic, an annual football game between Grambling State and Southern universities. Tillery realized his potential – that day led to the opening of a We Dat’s restaurant in 2016, and a second nearly a year ago.

The vision Natasha Case and Freya Estreller had was ice cream trucks in different cities across the country. They ended up with a brand of ice cream in 6,000 grocery stores. Case and Estreller founded Coolhaus with one food truck in Los Angeles in 2009.

Within a few years, they had a handful of trucks in the city, Dallas and New York. They also began test-marketing their ice cream at Whole Foods, and realized the best way to go national was selling ice cream in grocery stores. The trucks, which now number nine, and three stores in Southern California are laboratories, Case says.

“We can build a following before we bring our products to grocery stores,” she says. _____ Follow Joyce Rosenberg at www.twitter.com/JoyceMRosenberg.

Her work can be found here: https://apnews.com/search/joyce%20rosenberg

Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off

In this Friday, June 8, 2018, photo Gerald Abraham and Chizuru Abraham, who started their Japanese food truck in Los Angeles three years ago, pose for photo inside one of their Okamoto Kitchen trucks in Beverly Hills, Calif. Okamoto Kitchen has been successful, and added a second truck a year ago, because the couple has chosen their menu carefully.

Rather than sushi and tempura, they serve meat, fish and sandwiches using traditional Japanese flavors like ponzu. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off

In this Friday, June 8, 2018, photo customers get their lunch at the Japanese food truck Okamoto Kitchen in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Rather than sushi and tempura, they serve meat, fish and sandwiches using traditional Japanese flavors like ponzu. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off

In this Friday, June 8, 2018, photo chef Raimundo Bobadilla prepares a plate of Japanese Fried Chicken J.F.C. plate at the Japanese food truck Okamoto Kitchen in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Rather than sushi and tempura, they serve meat, fish and sandwiches using traditional Japanese flavors like ponzu. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off

In this Friday, June 8, 2018, photo Okamoto Kitchen’s Gerald Abraham, left, talks to regular customer, Eduardo Arias, at Okamoto Kitchen in Beverly Hills, Calif. When Gerald and Chizuru Abraham started their Japanese food truck in Los Angeles three years ago, they were undaunted by the fact that “the glory days are over,” Gerald Abraham says.

But Okamoto Kitchen has been successful, and added a second truck a year ago, because the couple has chosen their menu carefully. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off

In this Friday, June 8, 2018, photo spicy tuna stacks are prepared at the Japanese food truck Okamoto Kitchen serves in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Rather than sushi and tempura, they serve meat, fish and sandwiches using traditional Japanese flavors like ponzu. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off

In this Friday, June 8, 2018, photo a skateboarder rides past the Japanese food truck Okamoto Kitchen in Beverly Hills, Calif. But Okamoto Kitchen has been successful, and added a second truck a year ago, because the Gerald and Chizuru Abraham have chosen their menu carefully.

Rather than sushi and tempura, they serve meat, fish and sandwiches using traditional Japanese flavors like ponzu. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

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References

  1. ^ e-mail (www.dailymail.co.uk)

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