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Why travel brands see ground-based transport on the road ahead

The online skies may be crowded with companies selling flights but digital companies in the rail, bus and car sector see boom times ahead. Senay Boztas reports Bus travel is taking off – certainly if you talk to entrepreneurs who are moving from the crowded space of selling air flights online to trains, buses and car trips.

Clare Gilmartin, chief executive of the Trainline online ticket seller which has just added coach journeys to its offering, said that she sees clear tracks ahead for expansion in ground trips. “Rail and coach is a £250bn global market and 70% of it is bought offline,” she told the EyeforTravel Europe[1] summit in London earlier this month. “My phone is full of pictures of ticket queues across Europe. We added coach [travel] because it was very adjacent – the first ticket we sold was for someone who had missed their train at midnight.”

Rail and coach is a £250bn global market and 70% of it is bought offline

Some travel businesses believe that rail could have more barriers, though, for international travellers who don’t understand the network in a new country – and this is an opportunity for businesses to offer more personalised service.

Didier Pinson, CIO at Rail Europe, explained that the key to encouraging people to stay on the ground is a helping hand. “Most of our customers don’t understand the train system in Europe and in some cases are scared of it,” he said. “How to go from Paris Gare du Nord to the Gard du Lyon is scary for foreigners. Or using the subway in London. We have backpackers, families, businesses, seniors and we have to cope with their requests and requirements.”

Online ticketing does not suit all markets, he added: “Japanese customers expect you to print a ticket, put it nicely in an envelope and send it to their home address – while Americans complain that you haven’t sent the bar code to their phone.” Room for growth Rod Cuthbert, chairman of Rome2rio travel search engine agreed that the ground transport has space to grow. “Trainline sells half a million tickets a week online – we just don’t give a lot of prominence to these companies as Expedia and others haven’t got to rail yet,” he said.

“A very small percentage of road, rail and ferry is booked online. There’s tremendous opportunity for us as a company and for the industry to integrate that into their business.” Meanwhile, Brenda van Leeuwen, chief executive of Eurail – selling rail passes for Europe – said that the everyday nature of rail might have stopped travellers considering it for holidays. “Is air more attractive and rail seen as a commuter transport for work, or is it to do with technology?” she wondered. “Teaming up with Skyscanner or Expedia is the right way to go.

There need to be more talks to give rail a prominent place.”

There need to be more talks [with the likes of Skyscanner and Expedia] to give rail a prominent place

She believes that rail has a great advantage in connecting travellers to local communities. “People travel by train to get in contact with locals, and we are thinking about connecting travellers to help each other too,” she added. Meanwhile some start ups see opportunities in personal drivers: Tomas Turek, chief executive of Daytrip Europe[2], which connects tourists to English-speaking car drivers in 29 European countries, said: “There’s definitely a lot of growth ahead. We are teaching people to use ground transport instead of flights or trains.

For Americans coming to Europe, it’s a great relief to have someone drive them, show them around, and help with the local language.” Cutting down on flights could[3] be a quick way to reduce your environmental impact[4] too. So perhaps it’s time to save the skies, and look at the world from the ground.

Missed EyeforTravel Europe?

Join us at one of our upcoming events in Las Vegas or Amsterdam [5][6]

References

  1. ^ EyeforTravel Europe (www.eyefortravel.com)
  2. ^ Daytrip Europe (mydaytrip.com)
  3. ^ could (www.eea.europa.eu)
  4. ^ environmental impact (footprint.wwf.org.uk)
  5. ^ Las Vegas (events.eyefortravel.com)
  6. ^ Amsterdam (events.eyefortravel.com)

Global Air Cargo & Freight Logistics Industry Sales, Revenue, Gross Margin, Market Share, by Regions (2013-2025)

(EMAILWIRE.COM, June 14, 2018 ) Global Air Cargo & Freight Logistics Market report is replete with detailed analysis from a thorough research, especially on questions that border on market size, development environment, futuristic developments, operation situation, pathways and trend of Air Cargo & Freight Logistics. All these are offshoots of understanding the current situation that the industry is in, especially in 2018. The will chart the course for a more comprehensive organization and discernment of the competition situation in the Air Cargo & Freight Logistics market.

As this will help manufacturers and investors alike, to have a better understanding of the direction in which the Air Cargo & Freight Logistics Market is headed.
Access complete report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/global-air-cargo-freight-logistics-sales-market-report-2018

With this Air Cargo & Freight Logistics Market report, one is sure to keep up with information on the dogged competition for market share and control, between elite manufacturers. It also features, price, production, and revenue. It is where you will understand the politics and tussle of gaining control of a huge chunk of the market share.

As long as you are in search of key Industry data and information that can readily be accessed, you can rest assured that this report got them covered. Key companies profiled in this report are Bollore Group SDV, Cathay Pacific Airlines, CEVA Logistics, China Airlines, DB Schenker, Deutsche Post DHL, Expeditors International, FedExoration, Korean Airlines, Kuehne + Nagel International, Deutsche Lufthansaand others.
Purchase a copy of this report at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/buy-now/1181126[3] When taking a good look at this report, based on the product, it is evident that the report shows the rate of production, price, revenue, and market share as well as of the growth of each product type.

And emphasis is laid on the end users, as well as on the applications of the product. It is one report that hasn’t shied away from taking a critical look at the current status and future outlook for the consumption/sales of these products, by the end users and applications. Not forgetting the market share control and growth rate of Air Cargo & Freight Logistics Industry, per application.
All the queries about this report can be asked at: https://www.themarketreports.com/report/ask-your-query/1181126[4]

List of Chapters:
1 Air Cargo & Freight Logistics Market Overview
2 Global Air Cargo & Freight Logistics Competition by Players/Suppliers, Type and Application
3 United States Air Cargo & Freight Logistics (Volume, Value and Sales Price)
4 China Air Cargo & Freight Logistics (Volume, Value and Sales Price)
5 Europe Air Cargo & Freight Logistics (Volume, Value and Sales Price)
6 Japan Air Cargo & Freight Logistics (Volume, Value and Sales Price)
7 Southeast Asia Air Cargo & Freight Logistics (Volume, Value and Sales Price)
8 India Air Cargo & Freight Logistics (Volume, Value and Sales Price)
9 Global Air Cargo & Freight Logistics Players/Suppliers Profiles and Sales Data
10 Air Cargo & Freight Logistics Manufacturing Cost Analysis
11 Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers
12 Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders
13 Market Effect Factors Analysis
14 Global Air Cargo & Freight Logistics Market Forecast (2018-2025)
15 Research Findings and Conclusion
16 Appendix
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References

  1. ^ EMAILWIRE.COM (www.emailwire.com)
  2. ^ https://www.themarketreports.com/report/global-air-cargo-freight-logistics-sales-market-report-2018 (www.themarketreports.com)
  3. ^ https://www.themarketreports.com/report/buy-now/1181126 (www.themarketreports.com)
  4. ^ https://www.themarketreports.com/report/ask-your-query/1181126 (www.themarketreports.com)
  5. ^ https://www.themarketreports.com/ (www.themarketreports.com)

Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off

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NEW YORK (AP) – Starting a food truck to sell tacos or barbecue on downtown streets may seem easy or fun, but owners are finding they need more sophisticated plans now that the novelty has worn off. A culinary fad a decade ago, food trucks have lost some luster and even new ones may not draw a crowd. Many prospective restaurateurs now use trucks as low-cost test kitchens and as literal marketing vehicles.

And food truck operators soon realize they need to think strategically – especially about the winter. Jack and Max Barber started a food truck called Mainely Burgers in 2012, selling burgers and fries at the beach in Scarborough, Maine, and the next year added a second truck in Portland and an ice cream truck. But the competition with Portland’s restaurants was tough.

In this Friday, June 8, 2018, photo customers get their lunch at the Japanese food truck Okamoto Kitchen in Beverly Hills, Calif. Rather than sushi and tempura, they serve meat, fish and sandwiches using traditional Japanese flavors like ponzu. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

“We were definitely bummed out that doing the streets of Portland wasn’t working,” Jack Barber says. The brothers realized they had to change their business model. While the trucks are still a big part of the business, catering is a better way to bring in revenue.

The Barbers now have a full catering calendar, and business has been good enough that they have a restaurant in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Food trucks are still appealing to chefs and entrepreneurs because they cost less than restaurants to open – tens of thousands of dollars versus hundreds of thousands or more, says John Gordon, a restaurant consultant with Pacific Management Consulting Group. That difference was particularly attractive during the Great Recession, and the cheap menus drew consumers who could get unique food for less than at a restaurant.

But trucks feel less special to customers now, particularly in big cities, restaurant consultant Clark Wolf says. “They’re no longer a kind of secret, movable, underground treasure,” he says. The biggest growth in the industry is past, according to market research firm IBISWorld.

It counted 4,046 food trucks in the U.S. last year, nearly twice the number of 2008. But it projects annual revenue growth of 3 percent from 2017 to 2022, compared to 7.3 percent from 2012 to last year, when revenue totaled nearly £1 billion. When Gerald and Chizuru Abraham started their Japanese food truck in Los Angeles three years ago, they were undaunted by the fact that “the glory days are over,” Gerald Abraham says.

“The heyday when trucks could pull up just about anywhere and build a line in minutes is nothing short of a fantasy to us,” he says. But Okamoto Kitchen has been successful, and added a second truck a year ago, because the couple has chosen their menu carefully. Rather than sushi and tempura, they serve meat, fish and sandwiches using traditional Japanese flavors like ponzu.

“To survive, you have to have some sort of unique concept,” Abraham says. The couple also doesn’t bring the truck to the same locations too often so customers won’t tire of their cuisine. But selling vegan pizza daily at the same spot, outside Buzz Mill, an Austin, Texas, bar and coffee house, works for Robbie Lordi.

“We feed their regular customers, so they don’t have to leave to eat elsewhere,” says Lordi, who started his truck, Li’l Nonna’s, two years ago. It’s common for Austin bars without their own food operations to arrange with trucks to park nearby. Lordi also has a regular clientele, and business is growing enough that he’s considering adding a truck or opening a restaurant.

Finding a regular place has made Bruce Smith’s fried chicken truck, Chick-N-Nooga, a success – a turnaround from his first food truck, which succumbed to slow winter sales in 2013. Now Smith sells to employees of Amazon’s warehouse in Chattanooga, Tennessee, several days a week. That meant a 50 percent increase in revenue last month compared to May 2017.

“Amazon is the reason I survived,” Smith says. He’s now considering whether to expand, and like Lordi, deciding whether to do so with another truck or a restaurant. The owners’ struggles are proof that food trucks require a strategy, says Matt Geller, president of the industry group National Food Truck Association.

“If your dream is to own one food truck and make money, don’t do it,” he advises. Drew Pumphrey also needed a new plan. The first three years for his barbecue truck, The Smoking Swine, were tough; winters in Baltimore are lean times.

But two years ago, Smith’s truck was featured on the Food Network show, “Diners, Drive-ins and Dives,” and Pumphrey began getting catering orders from companies and organizations. “Most of that activity comes through the months when we’re not on the road that much, from November to March,” he says. Being in the right place at the right time helps.

Greg Tillery knew a food truck in New Orleans could lead to a bigger business, but “five years later I never would have guessed in my wildest dreams I would have a restaurant on Canal Street.” Two years later, the truck, We Dat’s, had a line of 60 people waiting for chicken and shrimp at the Bayou Classic, an annual football game between Grambling State and Southern universities. Tillery realized his potential – that day led to the opening of a We Dat’s restaurant in 2016, and a second nearly a year ago.

The vision Natasha Case and Freya Estreller had was ice cream trucks in different cities across the country. They ended up with a brand of ice cream in 6,000 grocery stores. Case and Estreller founded Coolhaus with one food truck in Los Angeles in 2009.

Within a few years, they had a handful of trucks in the city, Dallas and New York. They also began test-marketing their ice cream at Whole Foods, and realized the best way to go national was selling ice cream in grocery stores. The trucks, which now number nine, and three stores in Southern California are laboratories, Case says.

“We can build a following before we bring our products to grocery stores,” she says. _____ Follow Joyce Rosenberg at www.twitter.com/JoyceMRosenberg.

Her work can be found here: https://apnews.com/search/joyce%20rosenberg

Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off

In this Friday, June 8, 2018, photo Gerald Abraham and Chizuru Abraham, who started their Japanese food truck in Los Angeles three years ago, pose for photo inside one of their Okamoto Kitchen trucks in Beverly Hills, Calif. Okamoto Kitchen has been successful, and added a second truck a year ago, because the couple has chosen their menu carefully.

Rather than sushi and tempura, they serve meat, fish and sandwiches using traditional Japanese flavors like ponzu. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off

In this Friday, June 8, 2018, photo customers get their lunch at the Japanese food truck Okamoto Kitchen in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Rather than sushi and tempura, they serve meat, fish and sandwiches using traditional Japanese flavors like ponzu. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off

In this Friday, June 8, 2018, photo chef Raimundo Bobadilla prepares a plate of Japanese Fried Chicken J.F.C. plate at the Japanese food truck Okamoto Kitchen in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Rather than sushi and tempura, they serve meat, fish and sandwiches using traditional Japanese flavors like ponzu. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off

In this Friday, June 8, 2018, photo Okamoto Kitchen’s Gerald Abraham, left, talks to regular customer, Eduardo Arias, at Okamoto Kitchen in Beverly Hills, Calif. When Gerald and Chizuru Abraham started their Japanese food truck in Los Angeles three years ago, they were undaunted by the fact that “the glory days are over,” Gerald Abraham says.

But Okamoto Kitchen has been successful, and added a second truck a year ago, because the couple has chosen their menu carefully. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off

In this Friday, June 8, 2018, photo spicy tuna stacks are prepared at the Japanese food truck Okamoto Kitchen serves in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Rather than sushi and tempura, they serve meat, fish and sandwiches using traditional Japanese flavors like ponzu. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off

In this Friday, June 8, 2018, photo a skateboarder rides past the Japanese food truck Okamoto Kitchen in Beverly Hills, Calif. But Okamoto Kitchen has been successful, and added a second truck a year ago, because the Gerald and Chizuru Abraham have chosen their menu carefully.

Rather than sushi and tempura, they serve meat, fish and sandwiches using traditional Japanese flavors like ponzu. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

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References

  1. ^ e-mail (www.dailymail.co.uk)

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