service

Bosley Mill owner fined for explosion which killed four people

The Bosley Mill owner has been fined and given a suspended sentence for an explosion which killed four people.

George Boden, 64, from Stockport, was sentenced to nine months in prison[1], suspended for 18 months and handed a £12,000 fine at Chester Crown Court[2] today (June 18) after pleading guilty to offences under the Health and Safety at Work Act (HSWA) 1974.

He was also banned from being a company director for four years.

Dorothy Bailey, 62, Derek William Barks, 51, Derek Moore, 62, and Jason Shingler, 38, died in the blast in Bosley near Macclesfield[3] in 2015.

Others were seriously injured, and the sheer scale and impact of the explosion and the loss of lives that resulted, devastated the local community.

Top story: Man cut out of car with broken legs after head-on crash with reckless lorry overtaker[4]

The mill company, Wood Treatment Limited, was given a £75,000 fine for breaching HSWA S2, in failing to protect its employees from the risk of fire.[5]

Boden had previously admitted that the health and safety offence against the company was committed with his consent, connivance or neglect as managing director of Wood Treatment Limited (Health and Safety at Work Act, Section 37).

The sentencing was the culmination of a three month trial involving the company, director George Boden, operations manager Phillip Smith, 58, from Macclesfield[6], and mill manager Peter Shingler, 56, from Bosley.

In April, Justice May ordered the charges of corporate manslaughter and gross negligence be discontinued and directed the jury to find Phillip Smith and Peter Shingler, not guilty of any charges.

A joint investigation was launched between Cheshire Constabulary and the Health and Safety Executive, assisted by Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service.[7]

Detective Chief Inspector Paul Hughes, who led the police investigation, said: “The incident that day tore the heart out of the local community and resulted in a long and exhausting journey for those who lost loved ones and also those who suffered life-changing injuries.

“Following the incident our teams worked tirelessly to provide an extensive file of evidence to the Crown Prosecution Service who authorised the charges and a trial began in January.

“The families will never forget what happened that day and while this is not the outcome that they had hoped for I hope that this will, in some way, help to bring some form of closure for them.

“We’d ask the media to respect their privacy as they come to terms with the conclusion of this case.”

Sally Nicholson, Head of Operations for the North West, HSE, said: “Wood Treatment Ltd and its Director failed to ensure the health and safety of their employees, exposing them on a daily basis to the risk of a wood dust explosion, through lack of appropriate assessment and control.

“The company and Mr Boden in his capacity as Managing Director, have rightly been held to account for these significant failings.”

References

  1. ^ prison (www.cheshire-live.co.uk)
  2. ^ Chester Crown Court (www.cheshire-live.co.uk)
  3. ^ Bosley near Macclesfield (www.cheshire-live.co.uk)
  4. ^ Top story: Man cut out of car with broken legs after head-on crash with reckless lorry overtaker (www.cheshire-live.co.uk)
  5. ^ failing to protect its employees from the risk of fire. (www.cheshire-live.co.uk)
  6. ^ Macclesfield (www.cheshire-live.co.uk)
  7. ^ Cheshire Fire and Rescue Service. (www.cheshire-live.co.uk)

Hawker Hunter leaves Fort Paull on journey to its ‘spiritual’ home at the historic Hornby headquarters in Margate

The Hawker Hunter XF509 being loaded on Thursday at Fort Paull near Hull on the start of her journey to Margate Pic: Alex WoodThe Hawker Hunter XF509 being loaded on Thursday at Fort Paull near Hull on the start of her journey to Margate Pic: Alex Wood

The Hawker Hunter XF509 being loaded on Thursday at Fort Paull near Hull on the start of her journey to Margate Pic: Alex Wood

Lyndon Davies, chief executive of Hornby, bought the Hawker Hunter XF509 for £14,000 at auction earlier this year and plans to use it as a tribute to employees who died in recent times.

The aircraft was once fixed on a pole outside the Humbrol factory on Hedon Road in Hull, which closed in 2006.

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It later moved to the military museum at Fort Paull to the east of Hull until that closed last year.

The plane which stood outside for decades is now in a hangar at Manston in Kent, where she will stay temporarilyThe plane which stood outside for decades is now in a hangar at Manston in Kent, where she will stay temporarily
The plane which stood outside for decades is now in a hangar at Manston in Kent, where she will stay temporarily

Hornby owns brands including Hornby model railways, Scalextric, Humbrol and Airfix – which makes exactly the same kit version of the classic British jet aircraft.

The planes – which some believe were among the most beautiful ever made – entered RAF service in 1954 and still provided training support almost 40 years later.

Flight specialist for Hornby Hobbies Michael Clegg watched on as the plane was removed from its plinth and hoisted onto the back of a lorry for the start of the journey to Manston airfield in Kent, where it will be getting a bit of “TLC” before moving to Hornby’s headquarters in Margate.

The plane arrived at Manston on Friday morning and is now standing on her own wheels and under cover in a hangar for the first time in decades.

Auctioneer Andrew Baitson (pictured) sold the plane to Lyndon Davies earlier this yearAuctioneer Andrew Baitson (pictured) sold the plane to Lyndon Davies earlier this year
Auctioneer Andrew Baitson (pictured) sold the plane to Lyndon Davies earlier this year

The former RAF airfield played part in history as Meteor jets – the first Allied jet in service – flew from there in WW2.

The XF509 – which started out with 54 Squadron in 1957 and ended its career with No. 4 Flying Training School at RAF Valley – has its own 1:48 scale model.

Mr Clegg said: “She was a little reluctant to leave her plinth at first – she quite likes it here in Hull.

“She’s going to get some TLC (at Manston) and by the time we get her to Margate we’ll have a proper position for her.

The Hawker Hunter leaving Fort Paull on its journey to Manston, then Margate Pic: Michael CleggThe Hawker Hunter leaving Fort Paull on its journey to Manston, then Margate Pic: Michael Clegg
The Hawker Hunter leaving Fort Paull on its journey to Manston, then Margate Pic: Michael Clegg

“Lyndon Davies has done this out of the goodness of his heart – it shows how great a boss he is and how he cares about his staff.

“The people we lost really knocked us for six. This is a nice way for us to physically remember them.

“At the moment the intention is to display her at her traditional home in Margate, the old Hornby Hobbies factory, which used to make the trains.

“We have gone back (there) in the last couple of years – gone full circle to our spiritual home and this is where it will end up hopefully.

“We are all excited at the prospect of having her come home.”

Man died after walking onto M60 into path of lorry, inquest hears

An inquest has opened into a man who died after walking onto the M60 motorway into the path of a lorry.

Jan Kocurek, 45, was seen on CCTV accessing the motorway near junction 17, close to Whitefield and Prestwich, at 11am on Saturday, April 24.

He then walked into the traffic from the hard shoulder, an inquest opening at Rochdale Coroner’s Court heard.

A Ford Transit was travelling clockwise passing under the bridge of Bury New Road when it collided with him in lane two. A lorry then hit joiner Mr Kocurek in lane one.

The motorway was closed from around 11.30am until around 6pm[1] after the crash, with the air ambulance landing at the scene.

READ MORE: ‘Why did you drive away?’: Driver who left grandad to die spared jail[2]

Married Mr Kocurek, of Berkley Court, Bury Old Road, Salford, was critically ill in Salford Royal Hospital until June 4 when he died.

Assistant coroner for Manchester North, Julie Robertson, adjourned the hearing until January 18 next year but said the the evidence would be reviewed on October 11.

The air ambulance leaving the scene

That evidence would include an overview from Mr Kocurek’s GP, mental health services and a post mortem examination report, she said.

Following the announcement of Mr Kocurek’s death, police appealed for anyone who witnessed the collision to come forward.

Sergeant Andrew Page, from GMP’s Serious Collision Investigation Unit, said: “Despite the best efforts from hospital staff to save his life, Jan sadly passed away and our thoughts are with his family who are understandably devastated.

“We’ve been carrying out a number of enquiries since this collision happened and we’re continuing to ask any witnesses to come forward with information that may assist us with our investigation.

“Anyone who may have seen the collision, has dash-cam footage or perhaps saw the man prior to the collision is asked to call 0161 856 4741.

“Alternatively, contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.”

Helplines and websites

Samaritans (116 123) samaritans.org operates a 24-hour service available every day of the year. If you prefer to write down how you’re feeling, or if you’re worried about being overheard on the phone, you can email Samaritans at [email protected][3] , write to Freepost RSRB-KKBY-CYJK, PO Box 9090, STIRLING, FK8 2SA and visit www.samaritans.org/branches to find your nearest branch.

For support for people feeling suicidal, if you are concerned about someone or if you are bereaved by suicide see http://shiningalightonsuicide.org.uk[4]

CALM (0800 58 58 58) thecalmzone.net has a helpline is for men who are down or have hit a wall for any reason, who need to talk or find information and support. They’re open 5pm to midnight, 365 days a year.

Greater Manchester Bereavement Service Greater Manchester Bereavement Service can help to find support for anyone in Greater Manchester that has been bereaved or affected by a death. No one needs to feel alone as they deal with their grief. www.greater-manchester-bereavement-service.org.uk[5]

Childline (0800 1111 ) runs a helpline for children and young people in the UK. Calls are free and the number won’t show up on your phone bill.

PAPYRUS (0800 068 41 41) is a voluntary organisation supporting teenagers and young adults who are feeling suicidal.

Beat Eating Disorders: Beat provides helplines for adults and young people offering support and information about eating disorders. These helplines are free to call from all phones. Adult Helpline: 0808 801 0677, Studentline: 0808 801 0811, Youthline: 0808 801 0711. www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk[6]

Anorexia & Bulimia Care: ABC provide on-going care, emotional support and practical guidance for anyone affected by eating disorders, those struggling personally and parents, families and friends. Helpline: 03000 11 12 13. www.anorexiabulimiacare.org.uk/[7]

Students Against Depression is a website for students who are depressed, have a low mood or are having suicidal thoughts. Bullying UK is a website for both children and adults affected by bullying studentsagainstdepression.org[8]

For information and links to charities and organisations that can help with substance abuse, visit https://www.supportline.org.uk/problems/drugs/[9]

References

  1. ^ motorway was closed from around 11.30am until around 6pm (www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk)
  2. ^ ‘Why did you drive away?’: Driver who left grandad to die spared jail (www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk)
  3. ^ [email protected] (www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk)
  4. ^ http://shiningalightonsuicide.org.uk (t.co)
  5. ^ www.greater-manchester-bereavement-service.org.uk (www.greater-manchester-bereavement-service.org.uk)
  6. ^ www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk (www.beateatingdisorders.org.uk)
  7. ^ www.anorexiabulimiacare.org.uk/ (www.anorexiabulimiacare.org.uk)
  8. ^ studentsagainstdepression.org (www.google.com)
  9. ^ https://www.supportline.org.uk/problems/drugs/ (www.supportline.org.uk)

This is why ew Sheffield railhead is trucking boss’s crown achievement

It saw total victory for the Sheffield haulier, which grew with the popularity of road transport, while the giant rail depot withered with the decline of the steel industry and died.

But the story has a twist.

For the trucking firm has just spent £3m reviving the railhead. And co-founder Frank Newell say it’s his crowning achievement.

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Tinsley Marshalling Yards circa 1965. It had 32 marshalling lanes.Tinsley Marshalling Yards circa 1965. It had 32 marshalling lanes.

Tinsley Marshalling Yards circa 1965. It had 32 marshalling lanes.

Over just seven weeks earlier this year, the company laid out three acres of concrete and 700 yards of track and reconnected the yard to the rail network.

Today it is home to more than 800 shipping containers and receives two 34-wagon freight trains a day from the port of Felixstowe.

The service saves up to 400,000 road miles a week, cutting lorry pollution and congestion, and is already close to its 1,000 container capacity.

Frank, aged 69, said its popularity was a relief.

Frank Newell. Picture Scott MerryleesFrank Newell. Picture Scott Merrylees
Frank Newell. Picture Scott Merrylees

“It was a very big commitment for us as a family business. I’ve been in business for 50 years and have always taken educated gambles. You get to the stage where you have to play forward and do it.

“It’s the best thing I have done. I’m so proud of what we have achieved.”

A mechanic by trade, his youngest son, Anthony, aged 17, is employed in the workshop ‘on the spanners’ learning lorry maintenance.

Sons Stephen, 43, and John, 49, also worked their way up.

The site can store 1,000 containers.The site can store 1,000 containers.
The site can store 1,000 containers.

Frank added: “Going through the ranks gives them a good insight.”

He started with one lorry in 1971 and, with Paul Wright, built the firm into a £50m-a-year business that employs 300.

It is one of just a handful of road hauliers that have moved into rail and Tinsley is the only operation of its type in South Yorkshire, it is claimed.

Stephen said growing concerns about climate change led the firm to move fast.

Unloading the train with a £500,000 box stacker.Unloading the train with a £500,000 box stacker.
Unloading the train with a £500,000 box stacker.

“You have to be careful you don’t get left behind,” he added.

Containers are mostly from China and India and hold everything from patio slabs to clothing to car parts. But they do not have high value items like iPhones or ‘high consequence products’ like fireworks.

About 55 can fit on a train and they are unloaded by four £500,000 ‘box stackers’, including one which runs on hydrogenated vegetable oil, a green fuel.

Containers are taken to their final destination by lorry, some 80 a day in a 24-hour operation.

Stephen said they had used local suppliers, with concrete from Cemex in Attercliffe, reinforcing from BRC in Barnsley and ballast from Aggregate Industries’ quarry in Buxton.

The site is owned by Network Rail and leased to Newell & Wright for 35 years, with a reduction on rent because it is a brownfield site, he added.

Aerial view of Tinsley Marshalling Yards, Sheffield, December 1987.Aerial view of Tinsley Marshalling Yards, Sheffield, December 1987.
Aerial view of Tinsley Marshalling Yards, Sheffield, December 1987.

Its success meant they planned to add two more services, with freight trainers from Southampton and London Gateway on the Suffolk coast.

A second phase of expansion could see a similar-sized platform and storage area built to the south, closer to the bridge over the Parkway, near Junction 33 of the M1.

A third phase could use land to the north, close to two large warehouses that were built on what was the widest part of the marshalling yard.

In 1961, a tenth of the rail-borne freight in Britain originated in the Sheffield district. Tinsley Marshalling Yard was opened by the infamous Dr Richard Beeching in 1965 to serve the steel industry. At its height it handled 200 locomotives and 3,000 wagons a day.

But within a few short years it was hit by competition from road and closed in stages from 1985.

Duncan Clark, of Newell and Wright, said part of the site was cut out of rock and part was electrified, receiving electric trains from Manchester that came through the now closed Woodhead tunnel.

The yard was disused and disconnected from the rail network when Newell and Wright took it on. A new link was laid to the north connecting to a local line near Shepcote junction and then on to Rotherham station, Doncaster and the East Coast Mainline.

The company hopes to connect the site from the south providing a simpler and more direct route into the network, he added.

Sheffield South East MP Clive Betts said the company’s achievement was ‘fantastic’ and he would speak to the mayor of South Yorkshire and Department of Transport about providing financial backing.

He added: “I think what they have done is incredible and what they want to do is fantastic. It’s really rising to the climate challenge.

“I will be speaking to the mayor about how we can engage, this is a really important part of local infrastructure and should benefit a lot of firms.

“It’s also of national significance and I’ll be speaking to the Department of Transport about providing some sort of financial backing and support.

“There have been various plans over the years to reopen the yard but these guys have done it.”

Kevin Newman, senior route freight manager for Network Rail, hailed the site as part of the ‘vital role that freight has played in the country’s response to the Covid pandemic and how important it is to the recovery of the economy’.

“Reopening routes, expanding services and gaining new freight customers, as well as running longer, heavier trains, is helping to get more HGVs off the road.”

Newell & Wright Transport was formed in 1974 by Frank Newell and Paul Wright. At that time it was a ‘very small general haulage company’ operating from rented premises.

Over the years it grew and moved to larger sites three times before setting up, in 1987, on its current 6.5 acre freehold site at Tinsley.

Local journalism holds the powerful to account and gives people a voice. Please take out a digital subscription[1] or buy a paper.

Thank you. Nancy Fielder, editor.

A freight train from the port of Felixstowe arrives at Tinsley Marshalling Yard. Picture Scott MerryleesA freight train from the port of Felixstowe arrives at Tinsley Marshalling Yard. Picture Scott Merrylees
A freight train from the port of Felixstowe arrives at Tinsley Marshalling Yard. Picture Scott Merrylees
Three acres of concrete were laid to make the site.Three acres of concrete were laid to make the site.
Three acres of concrete were laid to make the site.
Frank Newell at Tinsley Marshalling Yards.Frank Newell at Tinsley Marshalling Yards.
Frank Newell at Tinsley Marshalling Yards.
From left: MP Clive Betts and Stephen and Frank Newell have their picture taken as a train arrives.From left: MP Clive Betts and Stephen and Frank Newell have their picture taken as a train arrives.
From left: MP Clive Betts and Stephen and Frank Newell have their picture taken as a train arrives.

References

  1. ^ digital subscription (www.thestar.co.uk)

Coventry lorry driver arrested after cyclist died in crash in Nuneaton this morning

A CYCLIST has died after a crash involving a bike and a lorry in Nuneaton this morning.

The man – believed to be in his 70s – happened in College Street near the junction with Bull Ring at 6.30am.

An ambulance, two paramedic officers and a critical care car from The Air Ambulance Service with a paramedic and doctor on board attended the scene but nothing could be done to save him and he was pronounced dead at the scene.

A 43-year-old man from Coventry has been arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving and driving under the influence of drugs.

Anyone who witnessed the collision or has dash cam footage should call 101 or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.