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This is why ew Sheffield railhead is trucking boss’s crown achievement

It saw total victory for the Sheffield haulier, which grew with the popularity of road transport, while the giant rail depot withered with the decline of the steel industry and died.

But the story has a twist.

For the trucking firm has just spent £3m reviving the railhead. And co-founder Frank Newell say it’s his crowning achievement.

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Tinsley Marshalling Yards circa 1965. It had 32 marshalling lanes.Tinsley Marshalling Yards circa 1965. It had 32 marshalling lanes.

Tinsley Marshalling Yards circa 1965. It had 32 marshalling lanes.

Over just seven weeks earlier this year, the company laid out three acres of concrete and 700 yards of track and reconnected the yard to the rail network.

Today it is home to more than 800 shipping containers and receives two 34-wagon freight trains a day from the port of Felixstowe.

The service saves up to 400,000 road miles a week, cutting lorry pollution and congestion, and is already close to its 1,000 container capacity.

Frank, aged 69, said its popularity was a relief.

Frank Newell. Picture Scott MerryleesFrank Newell. Picture Scott Merrylees
Frank Newell. Picture Scott Merrylees

“It was a very big commitment for us as a family business. I’ve been in business for 50 years and have always taken educated gambles. You get to the stage where you have to play forward and do it.

“It’s the best thing I have done. I’m so proud of what we have achieved.”

A mechanic by trade, his youngest son, Anthony, aged 17, is employed in the workshop ‘on the spanners’ learning lorry maintenance.

Sons Stephen, 43, and John, 49, also worked their way up.

The site can store 1,000 containers.The site can store 1,000 containers.
The site can store 1,000 containers.

Frank added: “Going through the ranks gives them a good insight.”

He started with one lorry in 1971 and, with Paul Wright, built the firm into a £50m-a-year business that employs 300.

It is one of just a handful of road hauliers that have moved into rail and Tinsley is the only operation of its type in South Yorkshire, it is claimed.

Stephen said growing concerns about climate change led the firm to move fast.

Unloading the train with a £500,000 box stacker.Unloading the train with a £500,000 box stacker.
Unloading the train with a £500,000 box stacker.

“You have to be careful you don’t get left behind,” he added.

Containers are mostly from China and India and hold everything from patio slabs to clothing to car parts. But they do not have high value items like iPhones or ‘high consequence products’ like fireworks.

About 55 can fit on a train and they are unloaded by four £500,000 ‘box stackers’, including one which runs on hydrogenated vegetable oil, a green fuel.

Containers are taken to their final destination by lorry, some 80 a day in a 24-hour operation.

Stephen said they had used local suppliers, with concrete from Cemex in Attercliffe, reinforcing from BRC in Barnsley and ballast from Aggregate Industries’ quarry in Buxton.

The site is owned by Network Rail and leased to Newell & Wright for 35 years, with a reduction on rent because it is a brownfield site, he added.

Aerial view of Tinsley Marshalling Yards, Sheffield, December 1987.Aerial view of Tinsley Marshalling Yards, Sheffield, December 1987.
Aerial view of Tinsley Marshalling Yards, Sheffield, December 1987.

Its success meant they planned to add two more services, with freight trainers from Southampton and London Gateway on the Suffolk coast.

A second phase of expansion could see a similar-sized platform and storage area built to the south, closer to the bridge over the Parkway, near Junction 33 of the M1.

A third phase could use land to the north, close to two large warehouses that were built on what was the widest part of the marshalling yard.

In 1961, a tenth of the rail-borne freight in Britain originated in the Sheffield district. Tinsley Marshalling Yard was opened by the infamous Dr Richard Beeching in 1965 to serve the steel industry. At its height it handled 200 locomotives and 3,000 wagons a day.

But within a few short years it was hit by competition from road and closed in stages from 1985.

Duncan Clark, of Newell and Wright, said part of the site was cut out of rock and part was electrified, receiving electric trains from Manchester that came through the now closed Woodhead tunnel.

The yard was disused and disconnected from the rail network when Newell and Wright took it on. A new link was laid to the north connecting to a local line near Shepcote junction and then on to Rotherham station, Doncaster and the East Coast Mainline.

The company hopes to connect the site from the south providing a simpler and more direct route into the network, he added.

Sheffield South East MP Clive Betts said the company’s achievement was ‘fantastic’ and he would speak to the mayor of South Yorkshire and Department of Transport about providing financial backing.

He added: “I think what they have done is incredible and what they want to do is fantastic. It’s really rising to the climate challenge.

“I will be speaking to the mayor about how we can engage, this is a really important part of local infrastructure and should benefit a lot of firms.

“It’s also of national significance and I’ll be speaking to the Department of Transport about providing some sort of financial backing and support.

“There have been various plans over the years to reopen the yard but these guys have done it.”

Kevin Newman, senior route freight manager for Network Rail, hailed the site as part of the ‘vital role that freight has played in the country’s response to the Covid pandemic and how important it is to the recovery of the economy’.

“Reopening routes, expanding services and gaining new freight customers, as well as running longer, heavier trains, is helping to get more HGVs off the road.”

Newell & Wright Transport was formed in 1974 by Frank Newell and Paul Wright. At that time it was a ‘very small general haulage company’ operating from rented premises.

Over the years it grew and moved to larger sites three times before setting up, in 1987, on its current 6.5 acre freehold site at Tinsley.

Local journalism holds the powerful to account and gives people a voice. Please take out a digital subscription[1] or buy a paper.

Thank you. Nancy Fielder, editor.

A freight train from the port of Felixstowe arrives at Tinsley Marshalling Yard. Picture Scott MerryleesA freight train from the port of Felixstowe arrives at Tinsley Marshalling Yard. Picture Scott Merrylees
A freight train from the port of Felixstowe arrives at Tinsley Marshalling Yard. Picture Scott Merrylees
Three acres of concrete were laid to make the site.Three acres of concrete were laid to make the site.
Three acres of concrete were laid to make the site.
Frank Newell at Tinsley Marshalling Yards.Frank Newell at Tinsley Marshalling Yards.
Frank Newell at Tinsley Marshalling Yards.
From left: MP Clive Betts and Stephen and Frank Newell have their picture taken as a train arrives.From left: MP Clive Betts and Stephen and Frank Newell have their picture taken as a train arrives.
From left: MP Clive Betts and Stephen and Frank Newell have their picture taken as a train arrives.

References

  1. ^ digital subscription (www.thestar.co.uk)

LIVE: Traffic stopped on M60 with major traffic delays after multi-vehicle crash

A section of the M60[1] has been closed following a collision involving multiple vehicles.

Traffic has been stopped on the M60 clockwise between junction 16 and 17 towards Swinton and Whitefield following the collision, traffic services say.

Traffic officers and recovery crews are on their way to the area.

A spokesperson for Greater Manchester Police confirmed the collision had involved three vehicles, with one of them being a lorry.

The collision has led to a series of long delays, with traffic currently reportedly backed up to Junction 10 to Urmston[2].

Transport for Greater Manchester has advised that people use alternative routes in order to avoid the congestion.

Follow our live blog below for the latest updates on this breaking news story.

References

  1. ^ M60 (www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk)
  2. ^ Urmston (www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk)

M62 driver parked lorry under bridge to stop man from jumping

A lorry driver has been hailed a hero after parking his truck under a bridge on the M62 to stop a man from jumping.

Tom Birkett, 35, was driving on the M62 near Warrington last week when he spotted someone sitting on the edge of a bridge with their legs dangling over the edge.[1]

The married dad-of-three slowed down as he approached – and managed to park his 44-tonne tipper truck directly underneath where the man was sitting.[2]

READ MORE:Thug spat chewed up sandwich remains in police officer’s face[3]

His Mercedes truck was also fitted with a canvas over the tipper, providing it with a soft top and essentially creating a net for the man to fall into, although luckily it was not needed.

Tom, from Kendal, Cumbria, said: “I was coming up to bridge when I clocked there were three people on it.

The lorry driver parked their vehicle underneath the man
The lorry driver parked their vehicle underneath the man (Image: Vulnerable Citizen Support Leeds)

“As I got closer I could see that the lad was sat on the wrong side of the barrier.[4]

“I thought, ‘I’m going to have to do something here, this lad’s going to jump off’.”

Tom then put his hazard lights on and began weaving his truck in order to notify other motorists there was a problem ahead.

He added: “I don’t know what clicked in my head but it suddenly dawned on me that I could help.

“I lined the truck up with the lad so the front of the trailer was underneath him.”

Receive newsletters with the latest news, sport and what’s on updates from the Liverpool ECHO by signing up here[5].

When Tom arrived, on June 8, police were already on the scene, including two officers on the bridge who were speaking to the man.

A short time later, a negotiator arrived and, according to Tom, spent around 45 mins talking to the man before he brought himself to safety.

Mental health and suicide support

Helplines and support groups

The following are helplines and support networks for people to talk to, mostly listed on the NHS Choices website[6]

  • Samaritans[7] (116 123) operates a 24-hour service available every day of the year. If you prefer to write down how you’re feeling, or if you’re worried about being overheard on the phone, you can email Samaritans at [email protected][8].
  • Childline[9] (0800 1111) runs a helpline for children and young people in the UK. Calls are free and the number won’t show up on your phone bill.
  • PAPYRUS[10] (0800 068 41 41) is an organisation supporting teenagers and young adults who are feeling suicidal.
  • Mind[11] (0300 123 3393) is a charity providing advice and support to empower anyone experiencing a mental health problem. They campaign to improve services, raise awareness and promote understanding.
  • Students Against Depression[12] is a website for students who are depressed, have a low mood or are having suicidal thoughts.
  • Bullying UK[13] is a website for both children and adults affected by bullying.
  • Amparo provides emotional and practical support for anyone who has been affected by a suicide. This includes dealing with police and coroners; helping with media enquiries; preparing for and attending an inquest and helping to access other, appropriate, local support services. Call 0330 088 9255 or visit www.amparo.org.uk[14] for more details.

  • Hub of Hope[15] is the UK’s most comprehensive national mental health support database. Download the free app, visit hubofhope.co.uk[16] or text HOPE to 85258 to find relevant services near you.
  • Young Persons Advisory Service – Providing mental health and emotional wellbeing services for Liverpool’s children, young people and families. tel: 0151 707 1025 email: [email protected][17][18]
  • Paul’s Place – providing free counselling and group sessions to anyone living in Merseyside who has lost a family member or friend to suicide. Tel: 0151 226 0696 or email: [email protected][19][20]
  • The Martin Gallier Project – offering face to face support for individuals considering suicide and their families. Opening hours 9.30-16.30, 7 days a week. Tel: 0151 644 0294 email: [email protected][21][22]

Tom said the entire ordeal lasted around two hours and that he was watching on from a barrier at the side of the road.

He added: “I can’t speak highly enough of how well the police did, they were fantastic. The negotiator did a phenomenal job too.

“I think what I did has been blown out of proportion, the police are the real heroes here.”

After watching the man get ushered away by police, Tom was allowed to return to his truck and continue his journey.

He said: “I hope that other drivers see this and know it’s an option.”

References

  1. ^ over the edge. (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  2. ^ man was sitting. (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  3. ^ Thug spat chewed up sandwich remains in police officer’s face (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  4. ^ the barrier. (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  5. ^ Liverpool ECHO by signing up here (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  6. ^ NHS Choices website (www.nhs.uk)
  7. ^ Samaritans (www.samaritans.org)
  8. ^ [email protected] (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  9. ^ Childline (www.childline.org.uk)
  10. ^ PAPYRUS (www.papyrus-uk.org)
  11. ^ Mind (www.mind.org.uk)
  12. ^ Students Against Depression (studentsagainstdepression.org)
  13. ^ Bullying UK (www.bullying.co.uk)
  14. ^ www.amparo.org.uk (www.amparo.org.uk)
  15. ^ Hub of Hope (www.hubofhope.co.uk)
  16. ^ hubofhope.co.uk (www.hubofhope.co.uk)
  17. ^ Young Persons Advisory Service (www.ypas.org.uk)
  18. ^ [email protected] (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  19. ^ Paul’s Place (beaconcounsellingtrust.co.uk)
  20. ^ [email protected] (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)
  21. ^ The Martin Gallier Project (www.gallierhouse.co.uk)
  22. ^ [email protected] (www.liverpoolecho.co.uk)

Three cars and a lorry involved in A350 crash, police confirm

Three cars and a lorry were involved in a crash on the A350.

Police were called out to the four-vehicle crash south of Westbury today (Thursday June 17) at 6.20am.

Read more: Road blocked following crash on A350[1]

The road was blocked for some time to allow emergency services to operate but has now reopened.

Get more Salisbury news[2]

You can also like our Facebook page[3] and follow us on Twitter[4] and Instagram[5] to stay up to date.

If you want online news with fewer ads, unlimited access and reader rewards – plus a chance to support our local journalism – find out more about registering or a digital subscription[6].

Email [email protected] with your comments, pictures, letters and news stories.

References

  1. ^ Road blocked following crash on A350 (www.salisburyjournal.co.uk)
  2. ^ Salisbury news (www.salisburyjournal.co.uk)
  3. ^ Facebook page (www.facebook.com)
  4. ^ Twitter (twitter.com)
  5. ^ Instagram (www.instagram.com)
  6. ^ registering or a digital subscription (www.salisburyjournal.co.uk)

Canada needs a national public transportation system

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THE CONVERSATION
This article was originally published on The Conversation, an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis an…